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Ableton live 10 standard Archives s

ableton live 10 standard Archives s

If we didn't have a standard pitch reference then musical instruments would Ableton Live 10 is an incredibly versatile digital audio workstation (DAW). All versions of Ableton Live come with the Simpler. build a dynamic instrument out of an array of audio files, Sampler is the way to go. By default, it is located here: C: > Program Data > Ableton > Live 9/10 This article explains how to display hidden files and folders in Windows.

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[Archive] nativeKONTROL PXT-Live Overview Part 1: Introduction

Ableton live 10 standard Archives s - think already

Fast, fluid and flexible software for music creation and performance.

Live 10 introduces four bold devices, new features and improvements that keep you in the flow, and an expanded sound library. Plus, a built-in Max for Live, extended Push features and much more.

Key Features - Live 10 Standard:

• Unlimited Audio and MIDI tracks
• Unlimited Scenes
• 12 Send and Return tracks
• mono audio input channels
• mono audio output channels
• Capture
• Complex warp modes
• Audio-slicing
• Audio to MIDI
• + Sounds (10+ GB)
• 5 Software Instruments
• 34 Audio Effects
• 8 MIDI Effects

What extras come in the box?

• A USB Stick with your Live 10 installer and included Packs

System Requirements

PC
• Windows 7 (SP1), Windows 8 or Windows 10 (bit)
• bit Intel Core or AMD multi-core processor (Intel Core processor or faster recommended)
• 4 GB RAM (8 GB or more recommended)
• x display resolution
• ASIO compatible audio hardware for Link support (also recommended for optimal audio performance)
• USB port (USB or better) for program installation
• Access to an internet connection for authorizing Live (for downloading additional content and updating Live, a fast internet connection is recommended)
• Approximately 3 GB disk space on the system drive for the basic installation (8 GB free disk space recommended)
• Up to 76 GB disk space for additionally available sound content

Mac
• OS X or later
• Intel Core2 Duo Processor (Intel Core i5 processor or faster recommended)
• 4 GB RAM (8 GB or more recommended)
• x display resolution
• Core Audio compliant audio interface recommended
• USB port (USB or better) for program installation
• Access to an internet connection for authorizing Live (for downloading additional content and updating Live, a fast internet connection is recommended)
• Approximately 3 GB disk space on the system drive for the basic installation (8 GB free disk space recommended)
• Up to 76 GB disk space for additionally available sound content

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Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Ableton Live

Digital audio workstation

Ableton Live is a digital audio workstation for macOS and Windows developed by Berlin-based Ableton. In contrast to many other software sequencers, Ableton Live is designed to be an instrument for live performances as well as a tool for composing, recording, arranging, mixing, and mastering. It is also used by DJs, as it offers a suite of controls for beatmatching, crossfading, and other different effects used by turntablists, and was one of the first music applications to automatically beatmatch songs. Live is available in three editions: Intro (with limited key features), Standard, and Suite.[3]

History[edit]

Ableton co-founders Gerhard Behles, Robert Henke, and Bernd Roggendorf developed Live from homemade software that Behles and Henke had created to facilitate their live music performances as Monolake. They released the first version of Live in as commercial software.[4][5] Ableton Live is written in C++. Live itself was not prototyped in Max, although most of the audio devices were.[6]

Features[edit]

Views[edit]

Live's user interface is composed of two 'Views' &#; the Arrangement View and the Session View. Live utilizes audio sample or MIDI sequences, referred to as Clips, which are arranged to be played live (i.e. triggered) or played back in a pre-arranged order. MIDI triggers notes on Live's built in instruments, as well as third party VST instruments or external hardware.

The Session View offers a grid-based representation of all of the Clips in a Live Set. These clips can be arranged into scenes which can then be triggered as a unit. For instance a drum, bass and guitar track might comprise a single scene. When moving on to the next scene, which may feature a synth bassline, the artist will trigger the scene, activating the clips for that scene.

The Arrangement View offers a horizontal music production timeline of Clips that is more similar to a traditional software sequencer interface. The Arrangement View is used for recording tracks from the session view and further manipulating their arrangement and effects. It is also used for manual MIDI sequencing.[7]

Instruments[edit]

The Intro version of Live includes four instruments (Impulse, Simpler, Instrument Rack, and Drum Rack) and the Standard version of Live additionally includes External Instrument, with users having the option to purchase additional instruments. By contrast, Live Suite includes all available instruments.

  • Impulse - a traditional drum triggering instrument which allows the user to define a kit of up to eight drum sounds, each based on a single sample. There are a number of effects available such as basic equalization, attack, decay, pitch shift, etc. Once the kit is defined, rhythms and beats are created through Live's MIDI sequencer.
  • Simpler - a basic sampling instrument. It functions using a single audio sample, applying simple effects, and envelopes, finally applying pitch transformations in the form of Granular synthesis. In this case, incoming MIDI does not trigger drums as it does in Impulse, but selects the final pitch of the sample, with C3 playing the sample at its original pitch.
  • Drum Rack - a sampler for drums. MIDI notes trigger individual "Simplers" so rather than triggering one sample at multiple pitches, individual samples are triggered at predefined pitches, as is suitable for MIDI drum programming. As is usual with Ableton almost anything can be drag dropped to or from the drum racks; for example, one can drop an audio clip or any MIDI device onto a drum rack note.
  • Instrument Rack - allows the user to combine multiple instruments and effects into a single device, allowing for split and layered sounds with customized macro controls.
  • Analog - simulates an analog synthesizer.
  • Bass - a monophonic virtual analog bass synthesizer.
  • Collision - a mallet percussionphysical modelling synthesizer.
  • Drum Synths - 8 devices for creating drum and percussion sounds via synthesis.
  • Electric - an electric piano instrument.
  • Operator - an FM synthesizer.
  • Poli - a virtual analog synthesizer that combines subtractive and FM synthesis
  • Sampler - an enhanced sampler.
  • Tension - a string physical modelling synthesizer.
  • Wavetable - a wavetable synthesizer featuring two oscillators and re-mappable modulation sources.

Ableton also has available a massive selection of Add-on Sample Packs with which a user can expand the sound libraries for their instruments.

  • Session Drums - a collection of sampled drum kits.
  • Latin Percussion - a collection of sampled latin percussion hits and loops.
  • Essential Instruments Collection - a large collection of acoustic and electric instrument samples.
  • Orchestral Instrument Collection - a collection of four different orchestral libraries, which can be purchased individually or as a bundle: Orchestral Strings, Orchestral Brass, Orchestral Woodwinds and Orchestral Percussion. The Orchestral Instrument Collection is included upon purchase of Live Suite but must be downloaded separately.

[8]

Dedicated hardware instruments[edit]

Akai Professional makes the APC40 mk II, a MIDI controller designed to work solely with Ableton Live. A smaller version, the APC20, was released in Though there are many MIDI controllers compatible with Live, these Akai units try to closely map the actual Ableton Live layout onto physical space. Novation Digital Music Systems has created the "Launchpad" which is a pad device that has been designed for use with Ableton. There are currently four different Launchpad models: Launchpad Mini, Launchpad X, Launchpad Pro, and Launchpad Control. Ableton has also released their own MIDI controller, the Push, which is the first pad-based controller that embraces scales and melody.[9] In November , Ableton released an updated MIDI controller, the Push 2, along with Live [10] Push 2, in terms of its design, features a new colorful display, improved buttons and pads, and a lighter frame.[11]

Effects[edit]

Most of Live's effects are already common effects in the digital signal processing world which have been adapted to fit Live's interface. They are tailored to suit Live's target audience &#; electronic musicians and DJs - but may also be used for other recording tasks such as processing a guitar rig. The effects featured in Ableton Live are grouped into two categories - MIDI effects and audio effects.

Live is also able to host VST plugins and, on the macOS version, Audio Unitplug-ins as well as Max for Live devices since Live 9.

Working with audio clips[edit]

Sashaplaying a DJ set using Ableton Live running on an iMac G5.

In addition to the instruments mentioned above, Live can work with samples. Live attempts to do beat analysis of the samples to find their meter, number of bars and the number of beats per minute. This makes it possible for Live to shift these samples to fit into loops that are tied into the piece's global tempo.

Additionally, Live's Time Warp feature can be used to either correct or adjust beat positions in the sample. By setting warp markers to a specific point in the sample, arbitrary points in the sample can be pegged to positions in the measure. For instance a drum beat that fell ms after the midpoint in measure may be adjusted so that it will be played back precisely at the midpoint.

Some artists and online stores, such as The Covert Operators and Puremagnetik, now make available sample packs that are pre-adjusted, with tempo information and warp markers added. The audio files are accompanied with an "analysis file" in Live's native format (.asd files).[12][13]

Ableton Live also supports Audio To MIDI, which converts audio samples into a sequence of MIDI notes using three different conversion methods including conversion to Melody, Harmony, or Rhythm. Once finished, Live will create a new MIDI track containing the fresh MIDI notes along with an instrument to play back the notes. Audio to midi conversion is not always % accurate and may require the artist or producer to manually adjust some notes.[14] See Fourier transform.

Envelopes[edit]

Almost all of the parameters in Live can be automated by envelopes which may be drawn either on clips, in which case they will be used in every performance of that clip, or on the entire arrangement. The most obvious examples are volume and track panning, but envelopes are also used in Live to control parameters of audio devices such as the root note of a resonator or a filter's cutoff frequency. Clip envelopes may also be mapped to MIDI controls, which can also control parameters in real-time using sliders, faders and such. Using the global transport record function will also record changes made to these parameters, creating an envelope for them.

User interface[edit]

Much of Live's interface comes from being designed for use in live performance, as well as for production.[15] There are few pop up messages or dialogs. Portions of the interface are hidden and shown based on arrows which may be clicked to show or hide a certain segment (e.g. to hide the instrument/effect list or to show or hide the help box).

Live now supports latency compensation for plug-in and mixer automation.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Live 11 Release Notes". Retrieved 16 August
  2. ^"Ableton Live End Use License Agreement". Archived from the original on August 19, Retrieved August 18,
  3. ^"Live comes in three editions: Intro, Standard and Suite. They share common features, but Standard and Suite have additional features, instruments, effects, and Packs". Ableton. Retrieved 23 February
  4. ^Battino, David; Richards, Kelli (). The Art of Digital Music. San Francisco, CA: Backbeat Books. p.&#;3. ISBN&#;.
  5. ^Slater, Maya-Roisin. "The Untold Story of Ableton Live—the Program That Transformed Electronic Music Performance Forever". alloverlimo.us. Vice Media LLC. Retrieved 8 August
  6. ^"Prototyping explained by Live co-creator Robert Henke". Archived from the original on Retrieved
  7. ^"A brief history of Ableton Live". Future Music. Future Music Publishing Quay House. Retrieved 13 August
  8. ^"Live 10 comes in three editions: Intro, Standard and Suite. They share common features, but Standard and Suite have additional features, instruments, effects, and Packs". alloverlimo.us. Retrieved 18 May
  9. ^"Using Push — Ableton Reference Manual Version 10 - Ableton". alloverlimo.us. Archived from the original on
  10. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on Retrieved CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Resident Advisor News: Ableton unveils Push 2 and Live
  11. ^"Create music with Ableton Push

    New features and improvements
    Bugfixes
    Changes for Push
    Push Bugfixes

    New features and improvements

    Arrangement Editing
    Automation
    Control Surfaces
    Interface Improvements
    Max for Live improvements
    MIDI editor
    New Devices and Device Improvements
    Setup
    Wavetable

    Arrangement Editing

    • When copying a time selection inside an automation lane, this can now be pasted upon the content lane. The copied automation will always land in the correct lane.

    Automation

    • When nudging a time selection in an automation lane, the automation outside the selection remains unchanged.
    • Enabled vertical auto-scrolling when dragging an automation lane.
    • Reintroduced the toggle button for showing/hiding additional automation lanes.
    • Additional automation lanes are now unfolded by default.
    • Improved the horizontal movement of a range of automation segments. Ramps are no longer created when a time selected range of automation is moved (by nudging or dragging) horizontally and is still partially within the original time range.
    • Fades no longer snap to the Arrangement View grid.

    Control Surfaces

    • Added support for IK Multimedia iRig Keys I/O.
    • When connected, the Novation Launchpad S and Launchpad Mini control surfaces are now automatically selected in the Preferences.

    Interface Improvements

    • Improved Live's perfomance when resizing audio clips in the Arrangement.
    • Added a gap between the handle and the track of the scrollbar in the Arrangement and Session View.
    • Sharpened the appearance of the triangle that appears above bipolar knobs.
    • Adjusted spacing between devices and meters in device chains.
    • Adjusted the color of the Arrangement Overview frame to increase visibility in dark Themes.
    • Changed the color of Drum Rack label to increase visibility in the Dark Theme.
    • Adjusted the spacing below Session View's horizontal scrollbar so that it is centered.
    • Adjusted the selection frame in device groups and corrected inconsistencies in the look and behaviour of the Sampler device.
    • A track created by dropping a single clip into the Session or Arrangement View's Drop Area now inherits the clip color instead of the source track color. When dropping several clips at the same time, the new track still inherits the source track color, as before.
    • Improved the playhead smoothness on Windows.

    Max for Live improvements

    • Max 7 license owners can edit gen~ patchers in Live 10's Max for Live editor.
    • Fixed permissions issues on macOS for non-Admin accounts.
    • Updated documentation for the Live Object Model.
    • Improved UI repainting and Live queue processing with many Max for Live devices.
    • Multi-core rendering in Live is now supported if a Set contains Max for Live devices.

    MIDI editor

    • MIDI note chasing now works when:  
      • scrubbing in the Arrangement View.
      • restarting transport using "Shift" + "Space" in the Arrangement View.
      • scrubbing in the Detail View of an Arrangement clip.
      • scrubbing in the Detail View of a Session clip.
    • Previously, there was a possibility that all MIDI notes in a key could disappear when stretched to an extremely small size (e.g., when using the ":2" button). This has now changed, and further stretching is not possible once notes reach a very small size.

    New Devices and Device Improvements

    • Filter curve visualisations in Wavetable are updated in real time in cases where e.g. an LFO or Envelope is mapped to the filter cutoff frequency.

    Setup

    • On Windows, Live now cleanly shuts down when a user logs out, shuts the computer down or reboots it. It also displays a message explaining why it is preventing the computer shutting down, giving the user 30 seconds to abort shutting down and save the Set.
    • Updated various info texts.
    • Added translations for the following lessons: "A Tour of Live", "Recording Audio", "Creating Beats", "Playing Software Instruments" and "Max for Live Devices".
    • When re-opening Live, the state of the Computer MIDI Keyboard on/off toggle is now remembered.

    Wavetable

    • In Wavetable's Mod Matrix, the left column containing target names now features bars that indicate the unmodulated and modulated value of the respective parameter. Additive modulation is indicated by a bipolar bar starting from the unmodulated value, while multiplicative modulation is indicated by a unipolar bar starting from the left.
    • When Live's transport is started or if there is a jump in beat time, Echo and Wavetable LFOs now update their phase if they are beat-synced.

    Bugfixes:

    Arrangement Editing
    Automation
    Browser
    Control Surfaces
    File Handling
    Interface Improvements
    Max for Live bugfixes
    MIDI editor
    Multi MIDI Clip editing
    Navigation
    Nested Groups
    Devices
    Setup
    Wavetable

    Arrangement Editing

    • Previously, when freezing a track, the hatched pattern that indicates frozen tails would also erroneously appear in the track's clip headers.
    • Previously, start and end markers for unwarped audio clips were erroneously quantized to the grid.
    • Creating a warp marker could trigger scrolling of the selected clip under certain circumstances.
    • Previously it was not possible to adjust the loop start position in unwarped audio clips without quantization.
    • A crash would occur when editing the crossfade between two very short clips.
    • Fixed a crash when removing a device that showed a parameter in an additional automation lane while the mouse is hovering over the parameter's automation.
    • The "Select Track Content" context menu command would not work on multiple selected tracks.

    Automation

    • Previously, when copying an Arrangement clip with existing automation to another track, automation would not be copied even if the target track and source track contained identical devices. Also, if a track is created by dragging a clip into the Arrangement drop area, all automation is now copied over and set to the the correct time.
    • Copying and pasting automation might lead to unexpected results, if the copied selection extended across multiple tracks.
    • The Show/Hide Additional Automation Lanes button is now always visible when unfolding a track that has been folded by resizing.
    • When pressing the Option (Alt) key and clicking on a track's Unfold Track button, the position of that track does not change.
    • MIDI Ctrl or Mixer modulation envelopes would be lost when dragging a clip from Arrangement to Session View.
    • Live could crash on Windows when clicking on a breakpoint while holding the grid modifier.
    • Positioning fade handles with arrow keys was not working correctly.

    Browser

    • AU plug-in default presets (.aupreset files) were no longer shown in the Live 10 browser.
    • Files from the "Current Project" label might fail to appear in the browser under certain circumstances.
    • File types unsupported in certain editions and when run as a ReWire slave (e.g., .amxd and .aupresets) erroneously appeared in Live's browser.
    • .M4A audio files would not show up in Live's browser anymore.

    Control Surfaces

    • Added bank definitions to Wavetable for third-party control surfaces.

    File Handling

    • Previously it was not possible to delete files or directories with names containing slashes.
    • Previously, toggling Automation Mode would create an Undo step.
    • Fixed a crash that occurred if a Live Set contained "{}" characters in its name.
    • Plug-ins and Sets that are saved in directory junctions on Windows work again.
    • Live would crash when launching the program by double-clicking a Live Set, in cases where the Live Set was corrupted.
    • Fixed a problem which might prevent AU presets from recalling correctly.

    Interface Improvements

    • Improved CPU usage by reducing the amount of graphic updates for the Detail View.
    • Live's window contents no longer briefly flicker after changes to a hardware display setup.
    • Depending on the language used in Live, the progress of the crash recovery wasn't visible on the splash screen because the text was clipped.
    • Improved the drag and drop handling on HiDPI screens. Previously, dragging a file from Explorer into Live would show the file at the wrong position in Live (Windows only).
    • Fixed a bug which caused text to overflow on top of the frame containing the browser's search field.
    • Fixed a bug which caused clips to be incorrectly colored when readded to a Live Set, if an .asd file was previously created.
    • On Windows 10 with HiDPI displays, dragging and dropping within Live, into Live, and within scaled plug-ins now works as expected. Please note that dragging and dropping from Live to other programs or to HiDPI-aware plug-ins may still cause issues when HiDPI Mode is active.
    • Fixed a bug where sequences of visually short borderless notes would be nearly invisible if crowded into overlapping pixel areas.
    • Fixed a minor visual issue affecting corners in grouped devices.
    • Fixed a minor inconsistency in the height of notes in Arrangement clips and clip previews.
    • Upon loading a Live Set, the clip envelope parameter selection would not be restored in the Detail View.
    • When double-clicking and dragging a slider control, the mouse cursor would not be hidden as expected, if Pen Tablet Mode was disabled.
    • Meters in Live's mixer would appear as stuck when loading a Set.
    • Improved UI performance on Windows when resizing Arrangement clips.
    • Fixed a bug which incorrectly applied bold formatting to chunks of text in the Help View.
    • If HiDPI was enabled on a Windows 10 machine, the preview of a dragged object (either dragged within Live or into Live) would appear offset.
    • If multiple audio clips were selected, changing a selection in the Detail View would create a wrong time selection in the Arrangement.
    • Removed inconsistent extra spacing from the context menu entry "Add Lane for Each Automated Envelope" in automation lane headers.
    • Previously, some radio buttons in certain devices displayed unreadable text.
    • On Windows with a HiDPI screen and HiDPI Mode enabled, it is once again possible to drag a file from Live into Explorer.
    • On Windows, dropping files from Addictive Drums 2 into Live works again.
    • When renaming Arrangement clips, the wrong mouse cursor would be displayed, making it difficult to insert the cursor at the desired position.
    • The grayed out text  "Open Groove Pool" in a clip's Groove Pool dropdown menu is now more visible in the Dark theme.
    • On Windows, if a plug-in showed a modal dialog, the main window could not be closed while that dialog was being shown.
    • When running Windows on a computer with a 4K screen and HiDPI Mode enabled, Live's UI would temporarily stop updating if the mouse hovered over an instance of the Spectrum device's breakout view.
    • On Windows 10 (version ) with HiDPI enabled, drag and drop now works as expected between Live, plug-ins and Max and the Explorer.
    • Horizontal sliders are now black instead of white in the Dark Theme (this is particularly noticeable for plug-in device parameters in the Detail View).

    Max for Live

    • Added the following changes to Max for Live:
      • File copying is now faster (this affects building standalones and Max For Live devices).
      • Restored Hints functionality.
      • alloverlimo.us~: height no longer changes when changing font.
      • Live could crash when deleting a Max for Live device which had a fullscreen window.
      • Live's main window can no longer obscure all other windows when using Max for Live devices.
      • Previously, Live might fail to access MIDI ports if the Max editor was open in the background at program launch.
      • The Max patcher window is now correctly sized on Windows.
      • Text in message boxes would sometimes appear cut off.
      • Various nodesnames attribute improvements.
      • Fixed issues with adding new objects to presentation mode.
      • poly~: fixed a crash which might occur when muting messages in nested poly~ patchers.
      • Seq object now properly records MIDI.
      • umenu and alloverlimo.us would block the Max scheduler while the drop-down list was displayed.
      • Firewall permissions dialog is appropriately suppressed in the Max for Live editor.
      • HiDPI: improved drawing when changing Windows display settings.
      • JS: sketch methods are no longer called on non-UI js objects in js_calljsfun().
      • Max Authorization Window: improved wording and user options.
      • mgraphics: deletion of temp file is now ensured when reading an .svg from a Max for Live device.
    • Performing an Undo after Macro-mapping a Max parameter would leave that parameter unmapped and unusable.
    • Live would crash when dragging a Live device on top of a Max for Live device.
    • Mapping Device Rack Macros to a alloverlimo.us would break under certain conditions after reloading the Set.

    MIDI editor

    • When folding an empty MIDI clip in a Drum Rack that contained at least one chain receiving all notes, the clip would fold to that chain only, whereas now the clip will not fold at all. Also, when switching between audio clips while a warp marker was selected, the Seg. BPM box would erroneously show the tempo of the previously selected marker. This would also lead to jumps in the displayed waveform visualization when the tempo was adjusted.
    • The Note Ruler in the MIDI Editor can now be double-clicked to vertically zoom to all used key tracks. In a multi-clip editing scenario, notes of all clips are taken into account, whereas previously only the notes of the foreground clip were considered. Additionally, fixed a bug which prevented the vertical zoom state from initializing correctly under certain circumstances.
    • Fixed a few minor bugs in the MIDI Editor:
      • when selecting one out of many selected notes, the selection would not revert to the selected note
      • when opening the context menu while hovering over a background note, and then clicking outside of the context menu, the background note would remain in a hovered state
      • when hovering over a background note, it was possible to highlight a momentarily invisible foreground note

    Multi Clip Editing

    • Previously, the adaptive grid size of a newly created clip could sometimes be incorrectly calculated when multi-clip editing.

    Navigation

    • Tracks in the Arrangement View would scroll out of view completely when toggling Automation Mode if the highlighted track was not visible.
    • When resizing an Arrangement track, only tracks whose header is selected will be resized. Previously, a track might be erroneously resized if a content selection existed on that track.
    • When scrolling up and down in the Arrangement View using a mousewheel, the view would only move in very small increments.
    • Previously, when extracting a Drum Rack chain to a new track, the zoom level and time selection were erroneously applied to the newly created clip.
    • When undoing the deletion of a note while in Arrangement View, the Clip View zoom level unexpectedly zoomed in to that note.
    • Previously, scrolling the Arrangement's mixer section with a mousewheel was not possible.
    • Previously, the time selection status display would not get updated when selecting a clip in the Arrangement.
    • The grid modifier would not toggle the grid when changing the time selection or moving the insert marker with the arrow keys.
    • Dragging a device over a Session return track header that overlapped a group device chain header would cause erratic scrolling in Session View.
    • On macOS, grid snapping would erroneously toggle when setting the Arrangement loop start/stop marker position by clicking inside the Arrangement View scrub area while holding the [CMD] modifier.

    Nested Groups

    • Fixed a crash that occurred when duplicating a nested Group Track containing a plug-in with an active modal dialog while Live's second window was open.

    New Devices and Device Improvements

    • The Arpeggiator device could lead to crashes under certain circumstances.
    • AU plug-in parameters might behave erratically when being controlled with the mouse, under certain circumstances.
    • It was erroneously possible to tweak parameters in the expanded view of certain devices, even if the track was frozen.
    • Under certain circumstances, some Wavetable and Echo parameters would not respond smoothly.
    • Simpler's settings would not be recalled correctly, if the device was set to Slice by Beat and its playback was not warped.
    • Echo's timing would change when exporting audio at a different sample rate than the one currently in use.
    • Under certain circumstances, Wavetable's polyphonic voice stealing would cause certain notes to get stuck.
    • A crash might occur when trying to preview a Live Clip in Live's browser, if this referenced a Wavetable device.
    • The switches on the left side of the Glue Compressor device are now centered.
    • Certain parameter names would be truncated in the left column of Wavetable's Modulation Matrix.
    • Dropping many samples onto a Simpler or a Drum Rack would take much longer in Live 10 than it did in Live 9.
    • Live could crash when loading certain Wavetable presets from the Core Library.

    Setup

    • Fixed a bug which caused a "alloverlimo.us corrupt" error when importing Preferences from bit Live versions.
    • Fixed a crash which occurred on startup under certain circumstances.
    • Added info texts translations for Drum Buss, Echo, Pedal and Wavetable devices.
    • On certain Windows machines, attempting to authorize Live 10 would fail.
    • While running, Live would fail to update the availability of MIDI ports.
    • Live was not able to prevent entering Sleep mode or turning off the display on Windows.
    • Changing the MTC Start Offset in the Preferences would have no effect.

    Wavetable

    • The animated sliders beneath the modulation target names would occasionally not appear in Wavetable.
    • Improved Wavetable's impact on CPU under certain circumstances.

    Changes for Push:

    Push

    • Improved the display of Live's color palette on third-party control surfaces.
    • Updated Push 2's firmware to version This version contains the updated color palette for Live

    Push Device Visualization

    • Added bank definitions to Pedal, Drum Buss, and Echo for third-party control surfaces.
    • Envelope visualizations are now available for Wavetable on Push 2.
    • It is now possible to select wavetables in the Wavetable device on Push 1.

    Push bugfixes:

    Push

    • The clip color palette for Push 1 was updated to match the Live 10 color palette.
    • The Push 1 browser would not display entries correctly if Live's language was set to Japanese.
    • Improved the touch-strip latency when working with MIDI tracks in Clip Mode on Push 2.
    • Fixed parameter sensitivities for Analog and Impulse devices on Push 2.

    Push Device Visualization

    • Wavetable's filter visualization on Push 2 might be displayed incorrectly after the Control Surface script was reinitialized.
    • A device's color would not update correctly on Push 2 when moving the device to a new track.
    • Push 2's display failed to indicate that an automation existed for certain Wavetable filter parameters.
    • The On/Off icon was missing for the Pitch envelope in the Operator device on Push 2.
    • Fixed envelope slope visualizations in Wavetable on Push 2.
    • Added missing parameters and icons for Operator and Analog's parameter banks on Push 2.
    • Fixed a scenario where Push 2's display could crash when hot-swapping AU plug-in presets.

    Push MIDI Clip Mode

    • After redoing a clip recording on Push 2, the wrong zoom state would be displayed.
    • The Note Settings view would close after touching an encoder, if all notes were being edited (Push 1 and Push 2).
    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

    Simpler vs Sampler - Everything You Need To Know

    All versions of Ableton Live come with the Simpler. In contrast, the Sampler is $99 dollars on its own, or included with Ableton Live Suite. 

    So, it’s assumed that the Sampler is bigger and better than Simpler, but what are the actual differences? What can you do with Sampler that’s worth an extra $99? 

    Well, the short answer is that Sampler is a multisampler, meaning that multiple samples can be loaded over the range of a keyboard as well as over a range of velocities. For example, if you had multiple samples of the same piano sound in different octaves, you could map them to a range of midi notes using Sampler. Multisampling is a world of its own, but Sampler is cool because it recognizes tons of different multisample formats such as Apple’s EXS format. 

    Simpler, on the other hand, is a single sample instrument. This means that one sample is mapped over the entire keyboard. 

    Both Simpler and Sampler include similar processing features, such as frequency modulation parameters (LFOs and), pitch envelopes, and ADSR control. Although Sampler definitely includes many more aspects of customization and sound design, they both cover output processing grounds. 

    That being said, Simpler is useful when you have a sound that you want to sample by itself. For example, you might want to use a drum hit or a vocal chop that you don’t want to manipulate too much. Simpler makes it easy to turn your sample into a midi instrument, and you’ll find that “easy” is never a bad thing when you are throwing an arrangement together during a moment of inspiration.

    A sampler is useful for sound design principles such as multisampling. If you really want to build a dynamic instrument out of an array of audio files, Sampler is the way to go. You also have more control over your sounds because there are more parameters/controls than there are in Simpler. 

    So… that’s it!! If you’re just starting out on your sampling journey, start exploring Simpler! It’s a great first step and an extremely powerful engine.

    by Maya Wagner

    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

    5. Managing Files and Sets

    Various types of files are used in making music with Live, from those containing MIDI (see ) and audio (see ), to more program-specific files such as Live Clips (see ) and Live Sets (see ). This chapter will explain everything you need to know about working with each of these file types in Live. However, we should first take a look at Live’s browser, through which most files arrive in the program.

    Working with the Browser

    Live’s browser is the place where you interact with your library of musical assets: the core library of sounds that are installed with the program, any additional sounds you’ve installed via Ableton Packs, presets and samples you’ve saved, your Ableton and third-party devices, and any folder on your hard drive that contains samples, tracks, etc.

    The browser display is divided into left and right sections, called the sidebar and the content pane respectively. To resize the sections, drag the divider line horizontally.

    Understanding the Browser’s Hierarchy

    Working in the browser involves choosing one of the labels from the Collections, Categories or Places sections in the sidebar, and then selecting from the items that appear in the content pane.

    The Collections labels each have their own assignable color, which you can use to tag items (including folders) that appear in the browser’s content pane. These labels (or “tags”) enable you to quickly organize and access particular browser items (for example, your favorite or most-used items).

    You can assign Collections labels via a selected item’s (PC) / -(Mac) context menu, or by using the number key shortcuts through to . Use to reset color assignments.

    Note that Collections labels can also be assigned to multiple browser items within a selection. Additionally, it is possible to assign a color label to different item “types”. For example, you can assign the same color label to a drum sound, a MIDI effect, and a plug-in.

    Clicking on a Collections label in the sidebar shows all items tagged with that color. Folders that appear in the Collections labels can be unfolded to show their contents.

    Each label can be renamed via their (PC) / -(Mac) context menu, or by pressing -(PC) / -(Mac). You can choose which labels are visible in the browser, by clicking the Edit button next to the Collections header, and checking the Show/Hide Label option next to each label.

    To exit Edit Mode, press the “Done” button.

    Note that when a hidden unassigned color becomes assigned to a browser item, the Collections label for that color will be shown in the sidebar automatically. However, visible color labels are not automatically hidden if all their assignments are removed.

    In the content pane, square icons indicate the respective color(s) assigned to each item. Note that although multiple colors can be assigned to an item, no more than three of those colors will be shown in the content pane.

    The Categories labels show all items of a given type, regardless of where they are in your library. Use this section to explore and discover all of the instruments and sounds you have installed. The Categories section is organized as follows:

    • Sounds — all of your Instrument Racks (see Chapter 20) and instrument presets, organized by the type of sound they make (rather than by their devices.)
    • Drums — all of your drum presets. This includes full drum kits, which are available as Drum Racks, as well as single drum hits, which are delivered as Instrument Racks.
    • Instruments — all of your Instrument Racks, as well as “raw” Live instruments and their presets, organized by device (rather than by the type of sound.)
    • Audio Effects — all of your Audio Effect Racks, as well as “raw” Live audio effects devices and presets.
    • MIDI Effects — all of your MIDI Effect Racks, as well as “raw” Live MIDI effects devices and presets.
    • Max for Live — all of your Max for Live (see Chapter 27) devices and presets, as well as any Racks that are built with those devices, organized into Audio Effect, Instrument and MIDI Effect folders.
    • Plug-Ins — your third-party VST and/or Audio Units plug-ins (see ).
    • Clips — all of your Live Clips.
    • Samples — all of your raw audio samples.
    • Grooves — all of your Grooves (see Chapter 13).
    • Templates — all of your template Live Sets (see ).
    • All results — this section appears after you’ve typed something into the search field. It shows search results for every section of the browser in a single list.

    The Places labels show the contents of folders on your hard drives. Use this section when you want to access a particular place, such as a folder you’ve added or an add-on Pack. The actual contents of the Places section will vary depending on how you’ve configured your library, but will contain at least the following:

    • Packs — all Packs that come pre-installed with Live, as well as any that you’ve installed yourself. Each Pack appears as a folder in the content pane, which can be unfolded to reveal that Pack’s contents. Presets, samples, and Live Clips installed by Packs will also appear in the appropriate Categories labels. The Packs label also shows updates for installed Packs, as well as additional Packs that you can install. Please refer to Downloading and Installing Packs in the Browser (see ) for more information.
    • User Library — the User Library is the default location for items you save yourself, including default presets, grooves, your personalized Racks and device presets, your own samples, Live Clips, etc. Files that you save to your User Library will also be available in the appropriate Categories labels.
    • Current Project — all of the files that are contained in the currently active Project (see ). If you’re working on a Live Set that you haven’t yet saved, the current Project refers to a temporary location.
    • any folders from any of your hard drives that you’ve added to Live’s Browser.

    Moving through the files in Live’s browser can be done with either the mouse or the computer keyboard:

    • Scroll up and down in the Browser with the up and down arrow keys, the mousewheel, or by clicking and dragging while holding the -(PC) / -(Mac) modifier.
    • Close and open folders, or move between the sidebar and content pane with the left and right arrow keys.

    By default, any previously open folders will close when you open a new one, but you can override this behavior by holding (PC) / (Mac) while opening new folders.

    Downloading and Installing Packs in the Browser

    The Packs label in the browser shows you all Packs that come pre-installed with Live, as well as any that you’ve installed yourself.

    To check for existing updates for your installed Packs, navigate to the Packs label and expand the Updates section.

    You can also view Packs that you own, but have not installed. These uninstalled Packs appear in the Available Packs section within the Packs label.

    You can download any of these Updates or Available Packs by pressing the download icon next to it.

    While the Pack is downloading, the download icon changes to a pause icon that indicates the progress of the Pack’s download.

    Should you need to, you can pause downloads and resume them at a later point. To pause a download, press the pause icon. When a download is paused, the paused icon changes back to a download icon.

    To resume a paused download, press the download icon again.

    (Note: you can download multiple selected Packs at the same time. You can also pause and resume downloading multiple selected Packs.)

    When the download is complete, you can install the Pack by pressing the Install button.

    Upon pressing the Install button, Live will display a progress bar that indicates the status of the process.

    Note that you can download a Pack, pause, resume or cancel a download, or install a Pack by choosing the appropriate command in that Pack’s (PC) / -(Mac) context menu.

    Sometimes you might need to know the size of a Pack before you download and install it. For example, you may have limited space on your hard drive. You can configure the browser to show the size of all Packs that appear in the Updates and Available Packs sections. To do this, (PC) / -(Mac) on the Name header in the browser’s content pane and choose the Size option in the context menu.

    You can delete an installed Pack via its (PC) / -(Mac) context menu. Note that deleted Packs will appear in your list of Available Packs.

    It is possible to configure Live’s Preferences to show or hide Updates and Available Packs in the browser. To do this, press the Show Downloadable Packs toggle in the Library Preferences.

    User Folders

    Live’s browser allows you to work with your creative tools regardless of where they are installed on your computer. This allows you to, for example, store large sample collections on one or more external drives, and still use the browser to access their contents - there is no need to keep them in a single centralized location.

    In order to work with your own folders in Live, you must first add them to the browser, either by dropping them directly into Live from the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac) or by pressing the Add Folder button in the browser’s sidebar.

    After adding a user folder, Live will scan it, which “teaches” the browser about its contents. Following this, it will appear in the Places section of the sidebar.

    Note: adding a user folder does not actually move the folder to a new location, but simply makes it available in Live’s browser. If you reorganize your drives using Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac), Live may not be able to find user folders if they’ve been moved. For example, if a user folder is contained on an external hard drive, and Live is opened without the drive attached, the user folder will still appear in the browser but will be grayed out. You can attempt to find it by using the (PC) / -(Mac) context menu’s Locate Folder command, or tell Live to “forget” this folder via the Remove from Sidebar command. You can also use this command to remove folders that aren’t missing, but which you simply don’t want to work with anymore.

    Searching for Files

    Live’s browser is equipped with a search field that filters the contents of the selected sidebar label as you type. To search across all locations, press -(PC) / -(Mac).

    The results will include files that match all search terms, as opposed to any. For example, if you search for “acoustic bass,“ the search will yield all acoustic bass sounds — not all acoustic sounds and all bass sounds.

    For mouse-free searching, we suggest the following sequence of shortcuts:

    1. -(PC) / -(Mac) to place a cursor in the search field;
    2. Type your search terms;
    3. Down arrow key to jump to the search results;
    4. Up and down arrow keys to scroll the search results;
    5. to clear the search field, showing all of the contents of the selected sidebar label.

    Live allows you to preview samples, clips, and instrument presets in the browser before they are imported into the program. To enable previewing, activate the Preview switch next to the Preview Tab at the bottom of the browser.

    Hint: You can preview files even when the Preview switch is not activated by pressing - or the right arrow key.

    Click on a file (or use the up and down arrow keys) to select it. Click in the Tab’s scrub area to make playback jump to that point. (Note that it is not possible to scrub clips that have been saved with Warp turned off.)

    You can select Live Clips in the browser to load them into the Preview Tab.

    You can also preview Live’s instrument presets in the Preview Tab. When selected, you’ll hear a short audio example of the preset, so you can get an idea of how it sounds before loading it.

    With the Raw button enabled, files will preview at their original tempo and will not loop. With Raw disabled, Live will try to preview files in sync with the current Set, so that you can better judge which samples will work for you. Please note that scrubbing is not possible when Raw is enabled.

    The previewing volume can be adjusted using the mixer’s Preview Volume knob.

    If your audio hardware offers multiple audio outs, you can privately audition, or cue, files via headphones connected to a separate pair of outs — while the music continues to play. To learn how to set up Live for cueing, please refer to the relevant section (see ) of the Mixing chapter.

    There are several ways to add clips to a Live Set:

    • Files can be dragged and dropped from the browser into tracks in the Session or Arrangement View. Dragging and dropping material from the browser into the space to the right of Session View tracks or below Arrangement View tracks will create a new track and place the new clip(s) there.
    • In the Session View, double-clicking or pressing on a file in the browser will automatically create a new track to the right of the other tracks and load it with the clip.
    • Files can be dropped directly into Live from the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac).

    In addition to the drag-and-drop method of loading files from the browser, Live offers a Hot-Swap Mode to reduce your mouse travel. Hot-Swap Mode can be toggled on and off with the key, and establishes a temporary link between the browser and, for example, a virtual instrument. While in Hot-Swap Mode, you can step through samples or presets to audition them “in place,“ that is, within the instrument. Hot-swapping for presets is covered in the Live Device Presets section (see ). Let’s go through an example of hot-swapping samples:

    Live’s built-in Impulse instrument features eight sample-player slots that can be filled by dropping samples into them. Alternatively, we can click the Hot-Swap button that appears as we move the mouse over a slot.

    Clicking the Hot-Swap button or pressing the key engages Hot-Swap Mode:

    While in Hot-Swap Mode, pressing the up or down arrow key moves to the next file in the content pane, and pressing or double-clicking the file loads it into the Impulse slot (presumably while Impulse is playing incoming MIDI notes). The link between the browser and the instrument will be broken if a different view is selected, or if the key or the Hot-Swap button is pressed again. Hot-swapping can also be cancelled with a press of the key or by pressing the close button in the Hot-Swap bar at the top of the browser.

    When Hot-Swap Mode is re-entered, the browser will show the location of the currently loaded sound and pre-select it.

    Sample Files

    A sample is a file that contains audio data. Live can play both uncompressed file formats (WAV, AIF and Sound Designer II for Mac) and compressed file formats (MP3, AAC, Ogg Vorbis, Ogg FLAC and FLAC). (Please note that not all of these file formats can be played in the Lite Edition.)

    A note on using Variable Bit Rate (VBR) files: Please install QuickTime for decoding purposes if you do not already have it on your system. It can be downloaded from the Apple website*.

    As Live plays the samples directly from disk, you can work with a large number of (large) samples without running into RAM memory limitations. Please note, however, that you may run into disk throughput problems if your disk is nearly full, and/or (on Windows systems) highly fragmented. Hard drive rotation speed can also affect disk performance. Refer to the section on managing the disk load (see ) for more information.

    Live can combine uncompressed mono or stereo samples of any length, sample rate or bit depth without prior conversion. To play a compressed sample, Live decodes the sample and writes the result to a temporary, uncompressed sample file. This usually happens quickly enough that you will be able to play the sample right away, without waiting for the decoding process to finish.

    Note: When adding a long sample to a project, Live might tell you that it cannot play the sample before it has been analyzed. Please see the section on analysis (see ) for an explanation.

    The Decoding Cache

    To save computational resources, Live keeps the decoded sample files of compressed samples in the cache. Maintenance of the cache is normally not required, as Live automatically deletes older files to make room for those that are new. You can, however, impose limits on the cache size using the File/Folder Preferences’ Decoding Cache section. The cache will not grow larger than the Maximum Cache Size setting, and it will always leave the Minimum Free Space on the hard disk. Pressing the nearby Cleanup button will delete all files not being used by the current Live Set.

    Analysis Files (.asd)

    An analysis file is a little file that Live creates when a sample file is brought into the program for the first time. The analysis file contains data gathered by Live to help optimize the stretching quality, speed up the waveform display and automatically detect the tempo of long samples (see ).

    When adding a long sample to a project, Live might tell you that it cannot play the sample before it has been analyzed. This will not happen if the sample has already been analyzed (i.e., Live finds an analysis file for this sample), or if the Record/Warp/Launch Preferences’ Auto-Warp Long Samples preference (see ) has been deactivated.

    An analysis file can also store default clip settings for the sample:

    Clicking the Clip View’s Save button (see ) will store the current clip’s settings with the sample’s analysis file. The next time the sample is dragged into Live, it will appear with all its clip settings intact. This is particularly useful for retaining Warp Marker settings with the sample. Storing default clip settings with the analysis file is different from saving the clip as a Live Clip.

    While analysis files are a handy way to store default information about a particular sample’s settings, keep in mind that you can use different settings for each clip within a Live Set — even if those clips refer to the same sample on disk. But if you drag a new version of the sample into a Live Set, Live will use the settings stored in the analysis file for the newly created clip.

    The analysis file’s name is the same as that of the associated sample, with an added “.asd“ extension. Live puts this analysis file in the same folder as the sample.

    Samples that have an file are displayed like this in the browser.

    Samples without an file look like this.

    The analysis files themselves do not appear in Live’s browser.

    Note that you can suppress the creation of files by turning off the Create Analysis Files option in the File/Folder Preferences. All data (except for the default clip settings) can be recreated by Live if the file is missing, however this will take some time for longer samples.

    Exporting Audio and Video

    The File menu’s Export Audio/Video command allows you to export Live’s audio output as new samples. The resulting files can be used to burn an audio CD for listening purposes or a data CD, which could serve as a backup of your work or be used with other digital audio applications. If your set includes video, you can also use the Export Audio/Video command to export this to a new video file, which will be created in the same directory as the rendered audio files. (Note: video export is not available in the Lite and Intro Editions.) You can also upload your exported audio files directly to your SoundCloud account.

    The Export dialog’s Rendered Track chooser offers several options for which audio signal to render:

    • Master — the post-fader signal at Live’s Master output. If you are monitoring the Master output, you can be sure that the rendered file will contain exactly what you hear.
    • All Individual Tracks — the post-fader signal at the output of each individual track, including return tracks and MIDI tracks with instruments. Live will create a separate sample for each track. All samples will have the same length, making it easy to align them in other multitrack programs.
    • Selected Tracks Only — this is identical to the All Individual Tracks option, but only renders tracks that were selected prior to opening the Export dialog.
    • (single tracks) — the post-fader signal at the output of the selected track.

    The other Selection fields determine the start time and length of the exported material:

    • Render Start — sets the position at which rendering will begin.
    • Render Length — determines the length of the rendered sample.

    Tip — a fast way to set both the Render Start and Length values is to select a range of time in the Arrangement View prior to invoking the Export Audio/Video command. But remember — a rendered audio file contains only what you heard prior to rendering. So, for example, if you’re playing back some combination of Session View clips and Arrangement material, then that is what will be captured in your rendered file — regardless of which view is active when you render.

    The Export dialog offers several audio rendering options:

    • Include Return and Master Effects –If this is activated, Live will individually render each selected track with any return tracks used by that track, as well as effects used in the Master track. This is especially useful when rendering material for a live performance, or when providing stems to a mixing engineer or remix artist.
    • Render as Loop — If this is activated, Live will create a sample that can be used as a loop. For example, suppose your Live Set uses a delay effect. If Render as Loop is on, Live will go through the rendering process twice: The first pass will not actually write samples to disk, but add the specified delay effect. As the second pass starts writing audio to disk, it will include the delay “tail“ resulting from the first pass.
    • Convert to Mono — If this is activated, Live will create a mono file instead of a stereo file.
    • Normalize — If this is activated, the sample resulting from the render process will be normalized (i.e., the file will be amplified so that the highest peak attains the maximum available headroom).
    • Create Analysis File — If this is activated, Live will create an file that contains analysis information about the rendered sample. If you intend to use the new sample in Live, check this option.
    • Sample Rate — Note that your choice of sample rate works as follows: if you select a sample rate equal to or higher than the rate you’re using in your project (as set in the Audio tab of Live’s Preferences), Live will export in a single step, at the sample rate you’ve chosen in the Export dialog. If you export at a sample rate that is lower than your current project sample rate, Live will first export at the current project sample rate and then downsample the file in a second step using a high-quality process. Note that this may take a few moments.
    • Upload Audio toSoundCloud — If activated, a helper application will launch that will allow you to upload your exported audio file to SoundCloud.
    • Encode PCM — If activated, a lossless audio file is created.
    • File Type — WAV, AIFF, and FLAC formats are available for PCM export.
    • Bit Depth,Dither Options — If you are rendering at a bit depth lower than bit, choose one of the dither modes. Dithering adds a small amount of noise to rendered audio, but minimizes artifacts when reducing the bit depth. By default, Triangular is selected, which is the “safest“ mode to use if there is any possibility of doing additional processing on your file. Rectangular mode introduces an even smaller amount of dither noise, but at the expense of additional quantization error. The three Pow-r modes offer successively higher amounts of dithering, but with the noise pushed above the audible range. Note that dithering is a procedure that should only be applied once to any given audio file. If you plan to do further processing on your rendered file, it’s best to render to bit to avoid the need for dithering at this stage. In particular, the Pow-r modes should never be used for any material that will be sent on to a further mastering stage — these are for final output only. (Please note that the Pow-r modes are not available in the Intro and Lite Editions.)
    • Encode MP3 — If activated, a CBR kbps MP3 file is created. It is possible to export PCM and MP3 simultaneously. If neither toggle is enabled, the Export button will be disabled.

    (Note: video rendering is not available in the Intro and Lite Editions.)

    In addition to settings for audio rendering, the Export dialog provides additional options for rendering video:

    • Create Video — If this is activated, a video file will be created in the same directory as your rendered audio. Note that this option is only enabled if you have video clips in the Arrangement View. Also, it is not possible to only render a video file — enabling video rendering will always produce a video in addition to rendered audio.
    • Video Encoder — This chooser allows you to select the encoder to use for the video rendering. The choices you have here depend on the encoders you have installed.
    • Video Encoder Settings — This button opens the settings window for the selected encoder. Note that the settings options will vary depending on the encoder you have chosen. Certain encoders have no user-configurable options. In this case, the Edit button will be disabled.

    Once you’ve made your selections and clicked Export to begin the rendering process, audio rendering will begin. After the audio rendering is complete, the video will be rendered. Note that, depending on the encoder used, video rendering may occur in more than one pass. Live will display a progress bar that will indicate the status of the process.

    Unless you’ve specified a special window size or aspect ratio in the encoder settings, the rendered video file will play back exactly as it appeared during real time playback in Live. The video file will also contain the rendered audio.

    For more information about working with video in Live, see the chapter on video (see Chapter 23).

    Normally, rendering happens as an offline process. But if your set contains an External Audio Effect (see ) or External Instrument (see ) that routes to a hardware effects device or synthesizer, the rendering process is a bit different. In this case, rendering the master output happens in real time. If you render single tracks, all tracks that don’t route to an external device anywhere in their signal paths will be rendered offline. Then, any tracks that do access these devices will be rendered in real time. Live will automatically trace each track’s signal flow and detect if real-time rendering is necessary. You’ll then be presented with several options when you start to render:

    Waiting for External Devices to Become Silent.

    • Skip — By default, Live will wait for ten seconds before starting a real-time render. This should allow any sound from external devices to fade out, but if you need more time (for example, if you’re waiting for a long reverb tail), you can increase the wait time by typing a new number in the number box. On the other hand, if you’re sure that your external devices aren’t making any sound, you can speed the process along by pressing “Skip,“ which will start the render immediately.

    After the render has begun, the dialog changes to show a recording progress bar:

    • Auto-Restart on drop-outs — Rendering in real-time requires somewhat more CPU power than non-real-time rendering, and in some cases drop-outs (small gaps or glitches in the audio) can occur. Live detects when drop-outs happen, and rendering will start again from the beginning if the Auto-Restart option is enabled.
    • Restart — manually restarts the rendering process.
    • Cancel — stops the rendering process and deletes the partially rendered file.

    The number of rendering attempts (if there has been more than one) will also be listed in the dialog box. If you find that dropouts and restarts keep happening, you should close other running applications to allow more processing power for rendering. Please see the chapter on computer audio resources (see Chapter 33) for more tips on improving performance.

    MIDI Files

    A MIDI file contains commands that prompt MIDI compatible synthesizers or instruments, such as Live’s Simpler, to create specific musical output. MIDI files are exported by hardware and software MIDI sequencers. Importing MIDI files into Live works differently than with samples: MIDI file data is incorporated into the Live Set, and the resulting MIDI clips lose all reference to the original file. MIDI files appear with a special icon in the browser.

    You can import MIDI files by using the browser or the Create menu’s Import MIDI File command. Note that when using the Import MIDI File command in the Arrangement View, the file will be inserted at the Insert Marker position. When using the command in the Session View, the file will be inserted in the currently selected clip slot.

    Exporting MIDI Files

    Live MIDI clips can be exported as Standard MIDI files. To export a MIDI clip, use the File menu’s Export MIDI Clip command. This command will open a file-save dialog, allowing you to choose the location for your new MIDI file.

    Exporting a MIDI file is different from saving the clip as a Live Clip.

    Live Clips

    Individual audio or MIDI clips can be exported to disk in the Live Clip format for easy retrieval and reuse in any project. Audio clips only contain references to samples on disk (rather than the audio data itself), so they are very small, which makes it easy to develop and maintain your own collection.

    To save a clip from the open Live Set to disk, simply drag it to the Places section of the browser and drop it into the Current Project or any user folder. For audio clips, Live will manage the copying of the clip’s sample into this new location based on the selection in the Collect Files on Export chooser (see ). You can then type in a new name for the clip or confirm the one suggested by Live with .

    Live Clips are a great way of storing your ideas for later use or development, as they save not only the original clip, including all its clip and envelope settings, but also the original track’s devices. In order to recreate a Live Clip’s device chain, either drag it into a track containing no clips or devices, or drag it into the space in the Session or Arrangement View containing no tracks. Note that Live Clips that are imported into tracks already containing devices or clips will appear with their clip settings but not their devices. You could, for instance, drop a bassline Live Clip on an existing track that drives a bass instrument, rather than creating a new track.

    Clips belonging to any Live Sets already on disk are also Live Clips. Please see the section on merging Sets (see ) for more on this topic.

    Note that storing default clip settings with a sample’s analysis file is different from saving a Live Clip. The default clip in the file annotates the sample with sensible default values (warp, gain and pitch settings) so that it will play in a defined way when it is added to a Set. Live Clips, on the other hand, are stored on disk as separate musical ideas. For example, you could create a number of variations from the same audio clip by using different warp, pitch, envelope and effect settings, and store them all as separate Live Clips. In the browser, you could then independently sort and preview these clips, even though they are all referring to the same source sample.

    Live Sets

    The type of document that you create and work on in Live is called a Live Set. Think of this as a single “song.“ Sets must be saved inside projects, so that Live can keep track of and manage all of the various components of the Live Set: Live Clips, device presets, any samples used, etc.

    Creating, Opening and Saving Sets

    Use the File menu’s New Live Set command to create new Live Sets, and the Open Live Set or Open Recent Set command to open existing ones. In the browser, you can double-click or press on a Live Set to open it.

    The File menu’s Save Live Set command saves the current Live Set exactly as it is, including all clips and settings.

    You can use the Save Live Set As command to save the current Live Set under a different name and/or in a different directory location, or the Save a Copy command to create a copy of the current Live Set with a new name and/or new directory location.

    Merging Sets

    Live makes it easy to merge Sets, which can come in handy when combining work from different versions or pieces. To add all tracks (except the return tracks) from one Live Set into another, drag the Set from the browser into the current Set, and drop it onto any track title bar or into the drop area next to or below the tracks. The tracks from the dropped Set will be completely reconstructed, including their clips in the Session and Arrangement View, their devices, and their automation.

    If you prefer to import individual tracks from a Set, you can unfold the Live Set in the browser just as if it were a folder.

    You can now drag the individual tracks and drop them as described at the beginning of this section. Any grooves (see Chapter 13) that were saved with your Set are also available as a folder within the unfolded Set.

    You can also drag Group Tracks (see ) and nested Group Tracks from Live’s browser. Group Tracks can be expanded in the browser, allowing you to load an individual track from within.

    In addition to unfolding Sets, you can further unfold the tracks within the Sets to access the individual Session View clips that were used on the track:

    You can browse, preview and import Session View clips from the Set as if they had been stored as individual Live Clips. This means that any Live Set can serve as a pool of sounds for any other, suggesting creative reuse and crossover.

    Exporting Session Clips as New Sets

    You can export a selection of Session View clips as a new Live Set by dragging them to the browser. To export a Set, first click and drag, or use the or (PC) / (Mac) modifiers, to select more than one Session View clip. Then, simply drag and drop the clips into the Current Project or any user folder, where you can either confirm Live’s suggested name or type in one of your own.

    Template Sets

    Use the File menu’s Save Live Set As Default Set command to save the current Live Set as the default template. Live will use these settings as the initialized, default state for new Live Sets. You can use this to pre-configure:

    • Your multichannel input/output setup.
    • Preset devices, like EQs and Compressors, in every track.
    • Computer key mappings (see ).
    • MIDI mappings (see ).

    Note that any Live Set in Live’s browser can be set as the default Live Set via the Set Default Live Set context menu entry.

    In addition to this “master” default template, you can create additional template Sets for different types of projects, each with their own unique configuration of tracks, devices, etc. To do this, save the current Live Set using the File menu’s Save Live Set As Template command. Any Sets saved as a template will appear in the browser’s Templates category and the Templates folder in the User Library. (Note that the User Library’s Templates folder is automatically created the first time a template Set is saved.) These Sets will then function as templates: they will load with the configuration you saved, but with the name alloverlimo.us, ready to be used as a new Set.

    Viewing and Changing a Live Set’s File References

    To view a list of the files referenced by the current Live Set, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Set button, and then click the View Files button. Live will display one line for each file used by the Live Set. To list all clips or instruments in the Live Set where the file is actually used, click the triangle to expand the line. Here is what you can do:

    • Replace a file — Dragging a file from the browser and dropping it on an entry in the list makes the Live Set reference the new file instead of the old one. For samples used in audio clips, Live retains the clip properties; the Warp Markers are kept if the new sample has the same or a greater length as the old sample and discarded otherwise. Please note that replacing a sample will change all clips in your set that reference this sample.
    • Hot-swap files — Using the Hot-Swap button at the left-hand side of each entry, you can quickly browse through alternatives for the file that is currently being referenced. This is like dragging files here, only quicker.
    • Edit a referenced sample — using an external application (which can be chosen in the Preferences’ File/Folder tab). Clicking the Edit button will open the referenced sample in the external application. The sample will remain offline as long as the Edit switch is engaged. For samples used in audio clips, the current set of Warp Markers is retained only if the sample length remains the same as before. Note that the Edit button is only available for samples, not for other types of files such as Max for Live devices (see Chapter 27).
    • View a file’s location — The Location column states if a file is missing (see ), or if it resides in your User Library, a Project or somewhere else (“external“). When unfolded, the entry shows the specific places in the Set where the file is used.

    Live Projects

    A Live Project is a folder containing Live-related files that belong together. Consider, for example, work on a piece of music: You start out with an empty Live Set; you record audio and thereby create new sample files; you drag in samples from collections; you save different versions of the Live Set along the way so that you can go back and compare. Perhaps you also save Live Clips or device presets that “belong“ to this particular musical piece. The project folder for this Live Project will maintain all the files related to this piece of music — and Live’s File Manager will provide the tools you need to manage them (see ).

    Projects and Live Sets

    When you save a Live Set under a new name or in a new folder location, Live will create a new project folder and store the Live Set there — unless you are saving the Live Set into an existing Live Project. Let’s look at an example to illustrate this process:

    We have recorded some audio into a new Live Set. We now save the Live Set under the name “Tango“ on the Desktop. The Desktop is available in the browser because we have previously added it as a user folder. Here is the result as displayed by the Live browser:

    The project folder (“Tango Project“) contains the Live Set (“alloverlimo.us“) and a Samples folder, which in turn contains a Recorded folder with two samples in it. Note that the current Project is also indicated in the title bar of Live’s application window.

    Next, we record another track into our Project. We save the modified version of the Live Set under a new name so that we do not lose the previous version. Accepting the Save As command’s default suggestion, we store the new version of the song in the Tango Project folder.

    The Tango Project now contains two Live Sets, and its Samples/Recorded folder contains the samples used by both of them.

    And now for something completely different: We choose the File menu’s New Live Set command and record a samba tune. As this has nothing to do with our tango dabblings, we decide to save it outside the Tango Project folder, say on the Desktop. Live creates a new project folder named Samba Project next to Tango Project.

    So far we have seen how to create Live Projects and save versions of Live Sets into them. How do we open a Project? Simply by opening any of its contained Live Sets. Double-clicking “Tango with alloverlimo.us“ opens that Set and the associated Project — as displayed in Live’s title bar.

    Let’s suppose that, in the course of our work on “Tango with alloverlimo.us,“ we get sidetracked: The piece evolves towards something entirely different, and we feel that it should live in a Project of its own. So, we “Save As“ under a new name and in some location outside the current Project, say the Desktop:

    Note that the new project folder has no Samples folder (yet). “Electro with alloverlimo.us“ is still referencing the piano sample from the original Tango Project. There is nothing wrong with this except for when the Tango Project is moved away or deleted; then “Tango with alloverlimo.us“ will be missing samples. You can prevent this by collecting external files (see ). Even after the fact, Live’s tools for searching missing files (see ) can help solve this problem.

    There is actually no need to keep a Project’s Live Set exactly one level below the Project itself. Within a project folder, you can create any number of sub-folders and move files around to organize them as desired, although you many need to use the File Manager to “teach“ the Project about the changes you’ve made (see ).

    In general, Live will do what it can to prevent situations such as orphaned (Project-less) Live Sets, which have the potential of confusing both the user and Live’s file management tools. It cannot, however, control situations in which Sets or files are moved out of order and become disorganized via the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac).

    A note for users of older Live versions: Live does not allow overwriting Live Sets that were created by older major versions to prevent compatibility problems. Instead, you will be requested to “Save As“. Doing this will insure that the newly saved Live Sets reside in project folders.

    Projects and Presets

    By default, new instrument and effect presets are stored in your current Project. At times however, it may make more sense to save a preset to another folder or to your User Library, so that you can access them from other Projects. You can drag a preset between folders after saving it (see ), or simply drag the title bar of the device over a folder in the sidebar, wait for the content pane to open, and then drop it into the content pane, adding it to the folder.

    When saving presets that contain samples to a new location, Live may copy the samples depending on the settings in the Collect Files on Export chooser in the Library Preferences. You can then type in a new name for the device or confirm the one suggested by Live with .

    Managing Files in a Project

    Live’s File Manager offers several convenient tools for managing Projects. Once you’ve opened a Live Set that is part of the Project you wish to manage, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, and then click the Manage Project button. The File Manager will present you with an overview of the Project’s contents and tools for:

    • locating files that the Project is missing;
    • collecting external files into the Project (see ) ;
    • listing unused files in the Project (see ) ;
    • packing a Project in Pack format (see ) ;

    Locating Missing Files

    If you load a Live Set, Live Clip or preset that references files which are missing from their referenced locations, Live’s Status Bar (located at the bottom of the main screen) will display a warning message. Clips and instrument sample slots that reference missing samples will appear marked “Offline,“ and Live will play silence instead of the missing samples.

    Live’s File Manager offers tools for repairing these missing links. Click on the Status Bar message to access these. (This is actually a shortcut for choosing the Manage Files command from the File menu, clicking the Manage Set button, and then clicking the Locate button found in the Missing Files section.) The File Manager will present you with a list of the missing files and associated controls.

    Manual Repair

    To manually fix a broken file reference, locate the missing file in the browser, drag it over to the File Manager and drop it on the respective line in the list of missing files. Note that Live will not care if the file you offer is really the file that was missing.

    Automatic Repair

    Live offers a convenient automatic search function for repairing file references. To send Live on a search, click the Automatic Search section’s Go button. To reveal detailed options for guiding the automatic search function, click the neighboring triangular-shaped button.

    • Search Folder — includes a user-defined folder, as well as any sub-folders, in the search. To select the folder, click the associated Set Folder button.
    • Search Project — includes this Set’s project folder in the search.
    • Search Library — includes the Live Library in the search.

    For each missing file, the automatic search function may find any number of candidates. Let’s consider the following cases:

    • No candidate found — you can choose another folder and try again, or locate the sample manually.
    • One candidate found — Live accepts the candidate and considers the problem solved.
    • Several candidates found — Live requires your assistance: Click the Hot-Swap button (i.e., the leftmost item in every line of the list of missing files) to have the browser present the candidates in Hot-Swap Mode. You can now double-click the candidates in the browser to load them, as the music plays if you like.

    Collecting External Files

    To prevent a Live Set from containing broken file references, Live provides the option of collecting (i.e., copying) them into the Set’s project folder. This is accomplished via the File Manager:

    • Choose the Manage Files command from the File menu
    • Click the Manage Set button
    • Unfold the triangular-shaped fold button in the External Files section.

    Separated by location (other Projects, the User Library, installed by factory Packs, and elsewhere — sample collections from external drives, for example), the File Manager provides:

    • A file count and the associated disk space used;
    • A Show button that will list the files in the browser;
    • A Yes/No toggle for engaging or disengaging collection.

    Note: Make sure to confirm your choices by clicking the File Manager’s Collect and Save button!

    The File menu’s Collect All and Save command is a shortcut that collects and saves all external files referenced by the current Set, including those from Live’s Core Library or other installed Packs. Note that this can cause a lot of copying, especially if your Live Set uses large multisample collections!

    Collect Files on Export

    When you save Live Clips, device presets or tracks by dragging them into the Browser, Live manages the copying of associated files based on the selection made in the Collect Files on Export chooser in the Library Preferences. This chooser provides the following options:

    • Always, the default setting, will copy files into the same folder as the clip, preset, or track without notification.
    • When Ask is selected, Live provides a dialog box with options for copying files.
    • Never means that files will not be copied when saving.

    Aggregated Locating and Collecting

    Instead of having to deal with problems while you are in a creative mode, you might prefer putting aside some dedicated housekeeping time to solve all the problems in one go. Using Live’s File Manager, you can find missing files and collect external files not only for the current Live Set but also for:

    • The User Library — choose the Manage Files command from the File menu; then click the Manage User Library button.
    • The current Live Project — choose the Manage Files command from the File menu; then click the Manage Project button.
    • Any Live Project — (PC) / -(Mac) on a Project in the browser’s content pane, and choose the Manage Project option.
    • Any selection of Live Sets, Live Clips, Live Presets — (PC) / -(Mac) on the respective items in the browser, and choose the Manage Files command.

    Remember to click the Collect and Save button at the bottom of the File Manager when you are finished. Otherwise your changes will be discarded.

    Finding Unused Files

    Live’s File Manager can find the unused files in a Project for you. You can then review them and decide to delete them individually or collectively. When searching for “unused“ files, Live will inspect each file in a Project folder, checking if it is referenced by any of the Live Sets, Live Clips or device presets in the Project. If not, the file is regarded as unused — even if other Projects or programs still use it.

    To find the unused files for the currently open Project, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Project button, and then click on the triangular-shaped fold button next to “Unused Files“ to access a summary and the Show button. Clicking the Show button makes the browser list the unused files; there, you can preview samples (see ) and delete them if you like.

    Note you can also find the unused files from the Library: choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, then click the Manage Library button, and then see the Unused Files section.

    Last but not least, you can find the unused files for all Projects found in a specific folder (and its sub-folders): (PC) / -(Mac) on a folder in the browser and choose the Manage Projects command, then see the Unused Files section. Live inspects each Project individually and labels a file unused even if another Projects in the same folder does use that file. To prevent losses, you may want to first collect the files into their respective Projects and then purge the Projects of unused files.

    Packing Projects into Packs

    Live’s File Manager provides the option of packing a Live Project in Pack format for convenient archiving and transfer. To do this, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Project button, and then click on the triangular-shaped fold button next to “Packing.“ Click the Create Pack button to bring up a file-select dialog where you can specify the name and location of a new Pack file. Creating a new Pack from a Project does not affect the Project. If you want the Project deleted, you can delete it using the browser.

    Live employs lossless compression techniques to minimize the file size of Packs. Depending on the audio materials in a Project, this saves up to 50 percent in file size.

    To unpack a Pack (i.e., to restore the original Live Project), double-click the Pack file (.alp), drag it into the Live main window, or locate it via the File menu’s Install Pack command.

    File Management FAQs

    How Do I Create a Project?

    A Project is automatically created whenever you save a Live Set, except when you save it into a preexisting Project.

    How Can I Save Presets Into My Current Project?

    You can save presets directly to the current project by dragging from the device’s title bar and dropping into the Current Project label in the browser. You can then use the File Management tools, collect any referenced samples, etc.

    Can I Work On Multiple Versions of a Set?

    If you’d like to work on different versions of the same Live Set, save them into the same Project. This will usually be the Project that was created when you saved the first version of the Live Set. If a Project contains multiple Live Sets it will only collect one copy of any samples used by the various versions, which can save disk space and help with organization.

    Where Should I Save My Live Sets?

    You can save Live Sets anywhere you want, but saving to pre-existing Project folders can cause problems, and should be reserved for special cases. You should only save a Live Set to an existing Project if it is somehow related to the Project — for example, an alternate version of a song that’s already in the Project.

    Can I Use My Own Folder Structure Within a Project Folder?

    You can organize your files any way you want within a Project, but you’ll need to use the File Manager to relink the files that you’ve moved around:

    1. In Live’s Browser or via your operating system, reorganize the files and folders within your Project folder.
    2. Navigate to the Project folder in the Browser and choose Manage Project via the (PC) / -(Mac) context menu.
    3. If you’ve changed the original location of any samples used in the Project, the Missing Samples section of the File Manager will indicate this. Click the Locate button to search for the samples.
    4. Since you know that your samples are all in the Project folder, unfold Automatic Search. Then enable the Search Project and Fully Rescan Folders options. Finally, click Go to initiate the search.
    5. When searching is complete, click Collect and Save at the bottom of the File Manager to update the Project.
    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

    The Ableton Live Pack Archive

    Ableton Live Pack Archive

    My first free Ableton Live Packs in two convenient self-installing Ableton Live Packs! Everything from synths made from great hardware, synths made from strange sources, drums, drums from even stranger sources, effects, and more.

    Instrument Racks

    94 Audio Effect Racks

    13 MIDI FX Racks

    Drum Hits

    + Clips

    Requires Ableton Live 10 Standard or Above

    10 Years of Free Ableton Live Packs!

    Way back in March of , I was still in my early days of using Ableton Live. I armed an audio track in Live, using my laptop’s built-in mic. Because I was listening through my laptop speakers, I immediately got a harsh feedback. I played back the recording and decided to drop into Live’s Sampler. After adjusting a few parameters and tuning the feedback, I had a pretty nice sound melodic instrument. I decided to post it on my new website so other Live users could download it.

    After the weekend was over, I couldn’t believe that over people had downloaded it (thanks in big part to a post from Synthtopia). It inspired me to create a new Ableton Live Pack every week for the next year.

    Ten years later, there have been Live Packs, containing over Ableton Live Presets and Drum Samples. They have been paramount in creating my own sound and style.

    My first Ableton Live Instrument Rack!

    Ableton Live Packs Organized for Convenience

    As you might imagine, growing a library of sounds like this can get out of hand quickly. That’s why I turned to my friend, master of Ableton Live Pack organization, Animus Invidious of PerforModule.

    Animus went through the entire collection of my devices and turned them into 2 self-installing Ableton Live Packs. Simply double-clicking on the Packs will install them into your Packs in your Ableton Live Browser. Each preset has been organized into Sounds categories, and they even have audio previews when you click on them. This makes it easier than ever to find the perfect sound for your track!

    Easily find the perfect tool for your next project.

    Upgrade Your Ableton Live Experience!

    You’ll find all kinds of new sounds to use in your music in the Ableton Live Pack Archive. I’ve made playable instruments from vintage and modern synthesizers, classic video game systems, traditional acoustic instruments, field recordings, toys, household objects, animals… just about anything that makes noise! They cover about every imaginable type of sound, keys, drums, percussion, leads, pads, strings… all in unique and diverse ways.

    If you’re looking to step outside the boundaries of normal, stock sounds, then this is the collection for you!

    music production alloverlimo.us

    Live Pack Archive is FREE for Music Production Club Members

    The Music Production Club is a subscription to my work. Every month get new music production tools in your inbox.

    Membership includes:

    • Current Downloads (pictured below, changes monthly).

    • MPC Live Meetings - Join live interactive Zoom meetings with Ableton Certified Trainer, Brian Funk.

    • What Bob Ross Teaches Us About Music Production book.

    • MPC Discord Server - Learn and share with like-minded producers.

    • MPC Samples Folder - A collection of diverse samples to use in your own music.

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    Ableton Pack, Ableton Pack PremiumBrian Funkableton live, ableton live packs

    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

    How to Hack Ableton to Unlock Hidden Features!!!

    Ableton’s developers are bad-ass. Live allows users to take control of the DAW on a level that other DAWs just don’t. That’s why we sound designers, programmers, and creatives love it so much. From Max for Live to Ableton Themes, there are endless possibilities when it comes to creating your optimal Live environment. Ableton’s developers appreciate the collaboration and innovation of its community and encourage people to find ways to add more functionality to an already extremely functional system. 

    Something I uncovered recently while completing my daily ritual of scouring the dark web of music production blogs is that Ableton’s developers have left a little loophole that allows the unlocking of some unofficial features.

    This hack involves adding a plain text file to Ableton’s back-end preferences folder. When Ableton scans this folder and sees that this text file is present, new features are unlocked based on the commands in the text file!

    One of the most memorable features that I was able to scrape off the internet pavement was that Ableton actually has a hidden feature that allows you to display plugin titles and on/off buttons on track columns in Session View! I am really hoping Ableton will make this feature official and fix some of the imperfections that come along with it being a hack-activated feature. One of these imperfections is that sometimes you need to make the track wider to be able to see the title of the plugin. Another one is that you can only display the device name, not the preset name. Even so, this additional feature is insanely amazing. 

    We’ll go over more hackable elements soon, but let’s look at how to create this text file and unlock these hidden features.

    alloverlimo.us

    To start, simply create a text file with a text editor, title it alloverlimo.us, and be absolutely % sure that it is a plain text file, not an rtf or some other editor-specific format. 

    From here, find the Ableton Preferences folder inside your computer

    Mac OSX: /User/Library/Preferences/Ableton/Live x.x.x/

    Note: you will need to hold down ctrl while navigating to the Go menu when Finder is open to be able to see the Library folder.

    Windows 7, 8 and Vista: C: Users > username > Appdata > Roaming > Ableton > Live x.x.x > Preferences

    Simply save the file in the location specified above! Now we can start adding commands to the text file and unlocking hidden features! There are tons of text strings you can add to the text file, but these are some of my favorites that I was able to find and test out! Keep in mind that each string/command needs to be in its own line. 

    -ThinningAggressiveness=

    This command will unlock the ability to control the number of breakpoints added to an automation curve when recording automation in real-time. You can control the amount by replacing ‘’ with a decimal number between 0 and 1. The numbers lower than will create more breakpoints when recording automation, and those above will decrease the number of breakpoints. 

    This may seem like such a small detail, but the results of changing the decimal number are actually really significant and noticeable. I am someone who hates having 2 million breakpoints in my automation curves and this feature helps clean up my automation recording so much. If you want more precision and more breakpoints, that’s awesome too.

    -ShowDeviceSlots

    This one was the one I talked about above- it unlocks the ability to show plugins in track columns in the session view. You can turn this feature on and off by clicking on the little plug icon in the lower right corner by the crossfade toggle button. 

    -AutoAdjustMacroMappingRange

    This one is definitely only useful for specific situations, but having this in your alloverlimo.us file basically makes it so that when you map a parameter the minimum range value is set as whatever the parameter is currently set to rather than to 0%.

    For example, if you were mapping a cutoff knob to a knob on your controller and the parameter was set to 50%, then the minimum range when mapped would be set to 50% rather than 0% upon mapping. 

    This can be useful for workflow in very specific situations, especially if you are working with recording automation and you don’t want any of your parameters to go below a certain threshold but you don’t want to be fiddling with the ranges on each mapped parameter. 

    –_RelaxFileManagerSearch

    This is useful for when you want to replace missing files automatically but have multiple sources or small variations of the same file for whatever reason. When this is enabled Ableton bypasses the checksum comparison of Missing Candidate Replacement.

    -NoAutoArming

    Normally, Ableton will automatically arm a track when it is created. However, in some situations, you may not want this to happen, especially if you are adding tracks to your project while recording. This command disables this feature and makes it so that newly added tracks are not record enabled. 

    -_LegacyWaveformDrawing

    This one is honestly just fun! When added to your alloverlimo.us file, this will replace the updated waveform style from version and above with the old style of the waveform display. It's cool to check out how it used to look.

    -NoVstStartupScan

    This one is a game-changer for troubleshooting glitches and crashes in Ableton. When added, this command will stop Ableton from scanning VST plugins upon startup. This is so useful when there is an issue with Ableton crashing upon startup and you want to check if it is a plugin issue, or if you just don’t want to bother waiting for Ableton to scan for plugins and want to open it quickly to get a few things done. 

    -EnableArmOnSelection

    Personally, I think this one would be extremely annoying, but it’s worth adding it in case you might have a reason to use it! This command makes it so that any time you select a track it is automatically armed for recording. 

    Any of these commands can be suspended when you add a forward slash (/) before the command in the text file. This way you don’t have to worry about always typing the command out or grabbing it from the internet, you can just remove the slash to bring it back. 

    Most of these hidden features might seem like small details, but it is the little things that add up to create an optimal workflow. It’s super cool to play around with changing what you are used to, whether you decide to keep the change or not!

    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]
    ableton live 10 standard Archives s

    Ableton

    Music software company

    This article is about the company. For the software, see Ableton Live.

    Ableton AG is a German music software company that produces and distributes the production and performance program Ableton Live and a collection of related instruments and sample libraries, as well as their own hardware controller Ableton Push.[3] Ableton's office is located in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin, Germany, with a second office in Pasadena, California.[4][5]

    History[edit]

    Ableton was founded in by Gerhard Behles, Robert Henke, who together formed the group Monolake, and software engineer Bernd Roggendorf.[6] After Behles' work on granular synthesis for Native Instruments' Reaktor, as well as earlier software using a Silicon Graphics workstation at the Technical University of Berlin, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, Live was first released as commercial software in [7] Behles remains the chief executive officer of Ableton.[8]

    In MarchAbleton announced it was beginning a collaboration with Cycling '74, producers of Max/MSP. This collaboration is not directly based on Live or Max/MSP, but rather combines the two companies' strengths in a new product.[9][10]

    In Januarythe Ableton/Cycling '74 product "Max for Live" was announced. "Max for Live" makes it possible to create Max/MSP patches directly inside of Live. The patches act like other plug-ins in Live do, supporting preset saving, automation, and other features. It is possible to create both customized hardware plug-ins and patches as well as actions within those plug-ins that control every aspect of Live, essentially anything AutoCad 2022.0.1 Crack With Activation Key Plus Patch Download Latest can be clicked with a mouse.[11]

    Ableton holds many music production sessions and seminars to learn to use their software, and licenses "certified Ableton trainers."[12]

    In AprilAbleton published the hardcover book Making Music: 74 Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers written by Dennis DeSantis who is the Head of Documentation at Ableton and formerly a sound designer for Ableton live 10 standard Archives s Instruments. The work is organized according to three main categories: Problems of Beginning, Problems of Progressing, and Problems of Finishing and aims primarily to address "the non-technical aspects of the process of making music."[13] While it shows images only of Ableton Live, the information is not specific to Ableton Live.

    In JuneAbleton acquired Cycling '74, developers of the digital signal processing environment Max/MSP and its integrated version Max for Live.

    In the first quarter ofAbleton Live 10 was officially released, and the release of the new version added some new features to Ableton Push 2, including a new melodic step sequencing layout and MIDI note view.[14]

    In lateAbleton officially announced Ableton Live 11 for Q1 and was released on February 23 [15]

    Products[edit]

    Ableton Live[edit]

    Main article: Ableton Live

    Ableton Live is a digital audio workstation developed by Ableton and is currently in its eleventh version. There are four versions of the software, of which three are available for purchase: Live 11 Standard (the core software for music performance and creation), Live 11 Suite (Ableton Live, Max for Live + all of Ableton's software instruments/effects), Live 11 Intro (an introductory version of Live with track and effect limitations), and Live Lite (currently at version 11) that comes bundled free with a number of hardware and applications but is not available to buy separately. Ableton Live is designed to be used with a wide range of USB and MIDI controllers, as well as instruments and virtual instruments.[16][17]

    Ableton Push[edit]

    In Marchthe company released the Push controller for Live 9 in cooperation with Akai Professional.[18] It gives access to most performing elements within the Digital audio workstation from the one unit, playing notes on a device or instrument, sequencing melodic notes and parameters, and triggering clips via a 64 pad matrix.[16] In NovemberAbleton ableton live 10 standard Archives s the second iteration of the Push, Ableton Push 2, which features an onboard display and better integration with the Live software.[19]

    Ableton Operator[edit]

    Operator is a software synthesizer developed by Ableton, first released in [20] It runs exclusively in Ableton Live, and is included with the Suite version of the program; Live Lite users can purchase Operator separately for 99 USD.[21] It uses a hybrid of FM, subtractive, and additive synthesis with four oscillators, and has been used by artists including Skrillex and Monolake.[22][23]

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    Articles[edit]

    • The MusicRadar Team (Production Expo). "The 19 best DAW software apps in the world today" Archived (September ).
    • Golden, Ean. "Ableton Push: New Hardware Controller for Live" [2] (October )

    External links[edit]

    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

    5. Managing Files and Sets

    Various types of files are used in making music with Live, from those containing MIDI (see ) and audio (see ), to more program-specific files such as Live Clips (see ) and Live Sets (see ). This chapter will explain everything you need to know about working with each of these file types in Live. However, we should first take a look at Live’s browser, through which most files arrive in the program.

    Working with the Browser

    Live’s browser is the place where you interact with your library of musical assets: the core library of sounds that are installed with the program, any additional sounds you’ve installed via Ableton Packs, presets and samples you’ve saved, your Ableton and third-party devices, and any folder on your hard drive that contains samples, tracks, etc.

    The browser display is divided into left and right sections, called the sidebar and the content pane respectively. To resize the sections, drag the divider line horizontally.

    Understanding the Browser’s Hierarchy

    Working in the browser involves choosing one of the labels from the Collections, Categories or Places sections in the sidebar, and then selecting from the items that appear in the content pane.

    The Collections labels each have their own assignable color, ableton live 10 standard Archives s you can use to tag items (including folders) that appear in the browser’s content pane. These labels (or “tags”) enable you to quickly organize and access particular browser items (for example, your favorite or most-used items).

    You can assign Collections labels via a selected item’s (PC) / -(Mac) context menu, or by using the number key shortcuts through to. Use to reset color assignments.

    Note that Collections labels can also be assigned to multiple browser items within a selection. Additionally, it is possible to assign a color label to different item “types”. For example, you can assign the same color label to a drum sound, a MIDI effect, and a plug-in.

    Clicking on a Collections label in the sidebar shows all items tagged with that color. Folders that appear in the Collections labels can be unfolded to show their contents.

    Each label can be renamed via their (PC) / -(Mac) context menu, or by pressing -(PC) / -(Mac). You can choose which labels are visible in the browser, by clicking the Edit button next to the Collections header, and checking the Show/Hide Label option next to each label.

    To exit Edit Mode, press the “Done” button.

    Note that when a hidden unassigned color becomes assigned to a browser item, the Collections label for that color will be shown in the sidebar automatically. However, visible color labels are not automatically hidden if all their assignments are removed.

    In the content pane, square icons indicate the respective color(s) assigned to each item. Note that although multiple colors can be assigned to an item, no more than three of those colors will be shown in the content pane.

    The Categories labels show all items of a given type, regardless of where they are in your library. Use this section to explore and discover all of the instruments and sounds you have installed. The Categories section is organized as follows:

    • Sounds — all of your Instrument Racks (see Chapter 20) and instrument presets, organized by the type of sound they make (rather than by their devices.)
    • Drums — all of your drum presets. This includes full drum kits, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, which are available as Drum Racks, as well as single drum hits, which are delivered as Instrument Racks.
    • Instruments — all of your Instrument Racks, as well as “raw” Live instruments and their presets, organized by device (rather than by the type of sound.)
    • Audio Effects — all of your Audio Effect Racks, as well as “raw” Live audio effects devices and presets.
    • MIDI Effects — all of your MIDI Effect Racks, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, as well as “raw” Live MIDI effects devices and presets.
    • Max for Live — all of your Max for Live (see Chapter 27) devices and presets, as well as any Racks that are built with those devices, organized into Audio Effect, Instrument and MIDI Effect folders.
    • Plug-Ins — your third-party VST and/or Audio Units plug-ins (see ).
    • Clips — all of your Live Clips.
    • Samples — all of your raw audio samples.
    • Grooves — all of your Grooves (see Chapter 13).
    • Templates — all of your template Live Sets (see ).
    • All results — this section appears after you’ve typed something into the search field. It shows search results for every section of the browser in a single list.

    The Places labels show the contents of folders on your hard drives. Use this section when you want to access a particular place, such as a folder you’ve added or an add-on Pack. The actual contents of the Places section will vary depending on ableton live 10 standard Archives s you’ve configured your library, but will contain at least the following:

    • Packs — all Packs that come pre-installed with Live, as well as any that you’ve installed yourself. Each Pack appears as a folder in the content pane, which can be unfolded to reveal that Pack’s contents, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. Presets, samples, and Live Clips installed by Packs will also appear in the appropriate Categories labels. The Packs label also shows updates for installed Packs, as well as additional Packs that you can install. Please refer to Downloading and Installing Packs in the Browser (see ) for more information.
    • User Library — the User Library is the default location for items you save yourself, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, including default presets, grooves, your personalized Racks and device presets, your own samples, Live Clips, etc. Files that you save to your User Library will also be available in the appropriate Categories labels.
    • Current Project — all of the files that are contained in the currently active Project (see ). If you’re working on a Live Set that you haven’t yet saved, the current Project refers to a temporary location.
    • any folders from any of your hard drives that you’ve added to Live’s Browser.

    Moving through the files in Live’s browser can be done with either the mouse or the computer keyboard:

    • Scroll up and down in the Browser with the up and down arrow keys, the mousewheel, or by clicking and dragging while holding the -(PC) / -(Mac) modifier.
    • Close and open folders, or move between the sidebar and content pane with the left and right arrow keys.

    By default, any previously open folders will close when you open a new one, but you can override this behavior by holding (PC) / (Mac) while opening new folders.

    Downloading and Installing Packs in the Browser

    The Packs label in the browser shows you all Packs that come pre-installed with Live, as well as any that you’ve installed yourself.

    To check for existing updates for your installed Packs, navigate to the Packs label and expand the Updates section.

    You can also view Packs that you own, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, but have not installed. These uninstalled Packs appear in the Available Packs section within the Packs label.

    You can download any of these Updates or Available Packs by pressing the download icon next to it.

    While the Pack is downloading, the download icon changes to a pause icon that indicates the progress of the Pack’s download.

    Should you need to, you can pause downloads and resume them at a later point. To pause a download, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, press the pause icon. When a download is paused, the paused icon changes back to a download icon.

    To resume a paused download, press the download icon again.

    (Note: you can download multiple selected Packs at the same time. You can also pause and resume downloading multiple selected Packs.)

    When the download is complete, you can install the Pack by pressing the Install button.

    Upon pressing the Install button, Live will display a progress bar that indicates the status of the process.

    Note that you can download a Pack, pause, resume or cancel a download, or install a Pack by choosing the appropriate command in that Pack’s (PC) / -(Mac) context menu.

    Sometimes you might need to know the size of a Pack before you download and install it. For example, you may have limited space on your hard drive. You can configure the browser to show the size of all Packs that appear in the Updates and Available Packs sections. To do this, (PC) / -(Mac) on the Name header in the browser’s content pane and choose the Size option in the context menu.

    You can delete an installed Pack via its (PC) / -(Mac) context menu, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. Note that deleted Packs will appear in your list of Available Packs.

    It is possible to configure Live’s Preferences to show or hide Updates and Available Packs in the browser. To do this, press the Show Downloadable Packs toggle in the Library Preferences.

    User Folders

    Live’s browser allows you to work with your creative tools regardless of where they are installed on your computer. This allows you to, for example, store large sample collections on one or more external drives, and still use the browser to access their contents - there is no need to keep them in a single centralized location, ableton live 10 standard Archives s.

    In order to work with your own folders in Live, you must first add them to the browser, either by dropping them directly into Live from the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac) or by pressing the Add Folder button in the browser’s sidebar.

    After adding a user folder, Live will scan it, which “teaches” the browser about its contents. Following this, it will appear in the Places section of the sidebar.

    Note: adding a user folder does not actually move the folder to a new location, but simply makes it available in Live’s browser. If you reorganize your drives using Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac), Live may not be able to find user folders if they’ve been moved. For example, if ableton live 10 standard Archives s user folder is contained on an external hard drive, and Live is opened without the drive attached, the user folder will still appear in the browser but will be grayed out. You can attempt to find it by using the (PC) / -(Mac) context menu’s Locate Folder command, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, or tell Live to “forget” this folder via the Remove from Sidebar command, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. You can also use this command to remove folders that aren’t missing, but which you simply don’t want to work with anymore.

    Searching for Files

    Live’s browser is equipped with a search field that filters the contents of the selected sidebar label as you type. To search across all locations, press -(PC) / -(Mac).

    The results will include files that match all search terms, as opposed to any, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. For example, if you search for “acoustic bass,“ the search will yield all acoustic bass sounds — not all acoustic sounds and all bass sounds.

    For mouse-free searching, we suggest the following sequence of shortcuts:

    1. -(PC) / -(Mac) to place a cursor in the search field;
    2. Type your search terms;
    3. Down arrow key to jump to the search results;
    4. Up and down arrow keys to scroll the search results;
    5. to clear the search field, showing all of the contents of the selected sidebar label.

    Live allows you to preview samples, clips, and instrument presets in the browser before they are imported into the program. To enable previewing, activate the Preview switch next to the Preview Tab at the bottom of the browser.

    Hint: You can preview files even when the Preview switch is not activated by pressing - or the right arrow key. ableton live 10 standard Archives s Click on a file (or use the up and down arrow keys) to select it. Click in the Tab’s scrub area to make playback jump to that point, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. (Note that it is not possible to scrub clips that have been saved with Warp turned off.)

    You can select Live Clips in the browser to load them into the Preview Tab.

    You can also preview Live’s instrument presets in the Preview Tab. When selected, you’ll hear a short audio example of the preset, so you can get an idea of how it sounds before loading it.

    With the Raw button enabled, files will preview at ableton live 10 standard Archives s original tempo and will not loop. With Raw disabled, Live will try to preview files in sync with the current Set, so that you can better judge which samples will work for you. Please note that scrubbing is not possible ableton live 10 standard Archives s Raw is enabled.

    The previewing volume can be adjusted using the mixer’s Preview Volume knob.

    If your audio hardware offers multiple audio outs, you can privately audition, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, or cue, files via headphones connected to a separate pair of outs — while the music continues to play. To learn how to set up Live for cueing, please refer to the relevant section (see ) of the Mixing chapter.

    There are several ways to add clips to a Live Set:

    • Files can be dragged and dropped from the browser into tracks in the Session or Arrangement View. Dragging and dropping material from the browser into the space to the right of Session View tracks or below Arrangement View tracks will create a new track and place the new clip(s) there.
    • In the Session View, double-clicking or pressing on a file in the browser will automatically create a new track to the right of the other tracks and load it with the clip.
    • Files can be dropped directly into Live from the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac).

    In addition to the drag-and-drop method of loading files from the browser, Live offers a Hot-Swap Mode to reduce your mouse travel. Hot-Swap Mode can be toggled on and off with the key, and establishes a temporary link between the browser and, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, for example, a virtual instrument. While in Hot-Swap Mode, you can step through samples or presets to audition them “in place,“ that is, within the instrument. Hot-swapping for presets is covered in the Live Device Presets section (see ). Let’s go through an example of hot-swapping samples:

    Live’s built-in Impulse instrument features eight sample-player slots that can be filled by dropping samples into them. Alternatively, we can click the Hot-Swap button that appears as we move the mouse over a slot.

    Clicking the Hot-Swap button or pressing the key engages Hot-Swap Mode:

    While in Hot-Swap Mode, pressing the up or down arrow key moves to the next file in the content pane, and pressing or double-clicking the file loads it into the Impulse slot (presumably while Impulse is playing incoming MIDI notes). The link between the browser and the instrument will be broken if a different view ableton live 10 standard Archives s selected, or if the key or the Hot-Swap button is pressed again. Hot-swapping can also be cancelled with a press of the key or by pressing the close button in the Hot-Swap bar at the top of the browser.

    When Hot-Swap Mode is re-entered, the browser will show the location of the currently loaded sound and pre-select it.

    Sample Files

    A sample is a file that contains audio data. Live can play both uncompressed file formats (WAV, AIF and Sound Designer II for Mac) and compressed file formats (MP3, AAC, Ogg Vorbis, Ogg FLAC and FLAC). (Please note that not all of these file formats can be played in the Lite Edition.)

    A note on using Variable Bit Rate (VBR) files: Please install QuickTime for decoding purposes if you do not already have it on your system. It can be downloaded from the Apple website*.

    As Live plays the samples directly from disk, you can work with a large number of (large) samples without running into RAM memory limitations. Please note, however, that you may run into disk throughput problems if your disk is nearly full, and/or (on Windows systems) highly fragmented. Hard drive rotation speed can also affect disk performance. Refer to the section on managing the disk load (see ) for more information.

    Live can combine uncompressed mono or stereo samples of any length, sample rate or bit depth without prior conversion. To play a compressed sample, Live decodes the sample and writes the result to a temporary, uncompressed sample file. This usually happens quickly enough that you will be able ableton live 10 standard Archives s play the sample right away, without waiting for the decoding process to finish.

    Note: When adding a long sample to a project, Live might tell you that it cannot play the sample before it has been analyzed. Please see the section on analysis (see ) for an explanation.

    The Decoding Cache

    To save computational resources, Live keeps the decoded sample files of compressed samples in the cache. Maintenance of the cache is normally not required, as Live automatically deletes older files to make room for those that are new. You can, however, impose limits on the cache size using the File/Folder Preferences’ Decoding Cache section. The cache will not grow larger than the Maximum Cache Size setting, and it will always leave the Minimum Free Space on the hard disk. Pressing the nearby Cleanup button will delete all files not being used by the current Live Set.

    Analysis Files (.asd)

    An analysis file is a little file that Live creates when a sample file is brought into the program for the first time, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. The analysis file contains data gathered by Live to help optimize the stretching quality, speed up the waveform display and automatically detect the tempo of long samples (see ).

    When adding a long sample to a project, Live might tell you that it cannot play the sample before it has been analyzed. This will not happen if the sample has already been analyzed (i.e., Live finds an analysis file for this sample), or if the Record/Warp/Launch Preferences’ Auto-Warp Long Samples preference (see ) has been deactivated.

    An ableton live 10 standard Archives s file can also store default clip settings for the sample:

    Clicking the Clip View’s Save button (see ) will store the current clip’s settings with the sample’s analysis file. The next time the sample is dragged into Live, it will appear with all its clip settings intact. This is particularly useful for retaining Warp Marker settings with the sample. Storing default clip settings with the analysis file is different from saving the clip as a Live Clip.

    While analysis files are a handy way to store default information about a particular sample’s settings, keep in mind that you can use different settings for each clip within a Live Set — even if those clips refer to the same sample on disk. But if you drag a new version of the sample into a Live Set, Live will use the settings stored in the analysis file for the newly created clip.

    The analysis file’s name is the same as that of the associated sample, with an added “.asd“ extension, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. Live puts this analysis file in the same folder as the sample.

    Samples that have an file are displayed like this in the browser.

    Samples without an file look like this.

    The ableton live 10 standard Archives s files themselves do not appear in Live’s browser.

    Note that you can suppress the creation of files by turning off the Create Analysis Files option in the File/Folder Preferences. All data (except for the default clip settings) can be recreated by Live if the file is missing, however this will take some time for longer samples.

    Exporting Audio and Video

    The File menu’s Export Audio/Video command allows you to export Live’s audio output as new samples. The resulting files can be used to burn an audio CD for listening purposes or a data CD, which could serve as a backup of your work or be used with other digital audio applications. If your set includes video, you can also use the Export Audio/Video command to export this to a new video file, which will be created in the same directory as the rendered audio files. (Note: video export is not available in the Lite and Intro Editions.) You can also upload your exported audio files directly to your SoundCloud account.

    The Export dialog’s Rendered Track chooser offers several options for which audio signal to render:

    • Master — the post-fader signal at Live’s Master output. If you are monitoring the Master output, you can be sure that the rendered file will contain exactly what you hear.
    • All Individual Tracks — the post-fader signal at the output of each individual track, including return tracks and MIDI tracks with instruments. Live will create a separate sample for each track. All samples will have the same length, making it easy to align them in other multitrack programs.
    • Selected Tracks Only — this is identical to the All Individual Tracks option, but only renders tracks that were selected prior to opening the Export dialog.
    • (single tracks) — the post-fader signal at the output of the selected track.

    The ableton live 10 standard Archives s Selection fields determine the start time and length of the exported material:

    • Render Start — sets the position at which rendering will begin.
    • Render Length — determines the length of the rendered sample.

    Tip — a fast way to set both the Render Start and Length values is to select a range of time in the Arrangement View prior to invoking the Export Audio/Video command. But remember — a rendered audio file contains only what you heard prior to rendering. So, for example, if you’re playing back some combination of Session View clips and Arrangement material, then that is what will be captured in your rendered file — regardless of which view is active when you render.

    The Export dialog offers several audio rendering options:

    • Include Return and Master Effects –If this is activated, Live will individually render each selected track with any return tracks used by that track, as well as effects used in the Master track. This is especially useful when rendering material for a live performance, or when providing stems to a mixing engineer or remix artist.
    • Render as Loop — If this is activated, Live will create a sample that can be used as a loop. For example, suppose your Live Set uses a delay effect. If Render as Loop is on, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, Live will go through the rendering process twice: The first pass will not actually write samples to disk, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, but add the specified delay effect. As the second pass starts writing audio to disk, it will include the delay “tail“ resulting from the first pass.
    • Convert to Mono — If this is activated, Live will create a mono file instead of a stereo file.
    • Normalize — If this is activated, the sample resulting from the render process will be normalized (i.e., the file will be amplified so that the highest peak attains the maximum available headroom).
    • Create Analysis File — If this is activated, Live will create an file that contains analysis information about the rendered sample. If you intend to use the new sample in Live, check this option.
    • Sample Rate — Note that your choice of sample rate works as follows: if you select a sample rate equal to or higher than the rate you’re using in your project (as set in the Audio tab of Live’s Preferences), Live will export in a single step, at the sample rate you’ve chosen in the Export dialog. If you export at a sample rate that is lower than your current project sample rate, Live will first export at the current project sample rate and then downsample the file in a second step using a high-quality process. Note that this may take a few moments.
    • Upload Audio toSoundCloud — If activated, a helper application will launch that will allow you to upload your exported audio file to SoundCloud.
    • Encode PCM — If activated, a lossless audio file is created.
    • File Type — WAV, AIFF, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, and FLAC formats are available for PCM export.
    • Bit Depth,Dither Options — If you are rendering at a bit depth lower than bit, choose one of the dither modes. Dithering adds a small amount of noise to rendered audio, but minimizes artifacts when reducing the bit depth. By default, Triangular is selected, which is the “safest“ mode to use if there is any possibility of doing additional processing on your file. Rectangular mode introduces an even smaller amount of dither noise, but at the expense of additional quantization error. The three Pow-r modes offer successively higher amounts of dithering, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, but with the noise pushed above the audible range. Note that dithering is a procedure that should only be applied once to any given audio file. If you plan to do further processing on your rendered file, it’s best to render to bit to avoid the need for dithering at this stage. In particular, the Pow-r modes should never be used for any material that will be sent on to a further mastering stage — these are for final output only. (Please note that the Pow-r modes are not available in the Intro and Lite Editions.)
    • Encode MP3 — If activated, a CBR kbps MP3 file is created. It is possible to export PCM and MP3 simultaneously. If neither toggle is enabled, the Export button will be disabled.

    (Note: video rendering is not available in the Intro and Lite Editions.)

    In addition to settings for audio rendering, the Export dialog provides additional options for rendering video:

    • Create Video — If this is activated, a video file will be created in the same directory as your rendered audio. Note that this option is only enabled if you have video clips in the Arrangement View. Also, it is not possible to only render a video file — enabling video rendering will always produce a video in addition to rendered audio.
    • Video Encoder — This chooser allows you to select the encoder to use for the video rendering. The choices you have here depend on the encoders you have installed.
    • Video Encoder Settings — This button opens the settings window for the selected encoder. Note that the settings options will vary depending on the encoder you have chosen. Certain encoders have no user-configurable options. In this case, the Edit button will be disabled.

    Once you’ve made your selections and clicked Export to begin the rendering process, audio rendering will begin. After the audio rendering is complete, the video will be rendered. Note that, depending on the encoder used, video rendering may occur in more than one pass. Live will display a progress bar that will indicate the status of the process.

    Unless you’ve specified a special window size or aspect ratio in the encoder settings, the rendered video file will play back exactly as it appeared during real time playback in Live. The video file will also contain the rendered audio, ableton live 10 standard Archives s.

    For more information about working with video in Live, see the chapter on video (see Chapter 23).

    Normally, rendering happens as an offline process. But if your set contains an External Audio Effect (see ) or External Instrument (see ) that routes to a hardware effects device or synthesizer, the rendering process is a bit different. In this case, rendering the master output happens in real time. If you render single tracks, all tracks that don’t route to an external device anywhere in their signal paths will be rendered offline. Then, any tracks that do access these devices will be rendered in real time. Live will automatically trace each track’s signal flow and detect if real-time rendering is necessary. You’ll then be presented with several options when you start to render:

    Waiting for External Devices to Become Silent.

    • Skip — By default, Live will wait for ten seconds before starting a real-time render. This should allow any sound from external devices to fade out, but if you need more time (for example, if you’re waiting for a long reverb tail), you can increase the wait time by typing a new number in the number box. On the other hand, if you’re sure that your external devices aren’t making any sound, you can speed the process along by pressing “Skip,“ which will start the render immediately.

    After the render has begun, the dialog changes to show a recording progress bar:

    • Auto-Restart on drop-outs — Rendering in real-time requires somewhat more CPU power than non-real-time rendering, and in some cases drop-outs (small gaps or glitches in the audio) can occur. Live detects when drop-outs happen, and rendering will start again from the beginning if the Auto-Restart option is enabled, ableton live 10 standard Archives s.
    • Restart — manually restarts the rendering process.
    • Cancel — stops the rendering process and deletes the partially rendered file.

    The number of rendering attempts (if there has been more than one) will also be listed in the dialog box, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. If you find that dropouts and restarts keep happening, you should close other running applications to allow more processing power for rendering. Please see the chapter on computer audio resources (see Chapter 33) for more tips on improving performance.

    MIDI Files

    A MIDI file contains commands that prompt MIDI compatible synthesizers or instruments, such as Live’s Simpler, to create specific musical output. MIDI ableton live 10 standard Archives s are exported by hardware and software MIDI sequencers. Importing MIDI files into Live works differently than with samples: MIDI file data is incorporated into the Live Set, and the resulting MIDI clips lose all reference to the original file. MIDI files appear with a special icon in the browser.

    You can import MIDI files by using the browser or the Create menu’s Import MIDI File command. Note that when using the Import MIDI File command in the Arrangement View, the file will be inserted at the Insert Marker position. When using the command in the Session View, the file will be inserted in the currently selected clip slot.

    Exporting MIDI Files

    Live MIDI clips can be exported as Standard MIDI files. To export a MIDI clip, use the File menu’s Export MIDI Clip command. This command will open a file-save dialog, allowing you to choose the location for your new MIDI file.

    Exporting a MIDI file is different from saving the clip as a Live Clip.

    Live Clips

    Individual audio or MIDI clips can be exported to disk in the Live Clip format for easy retrieval and reuse in any project. Audio clips only contain references to samples on disk (rather than the audio data itself), so they are very small, which makes it easy to develop and maintain your own collection.

    To save a clip from the open Live Set to disk, simply drag it to the Places section of the browser and drop it into the Current Project or any user folder. For audio clips, Live will manage the copying of the clip’s sample into this new location based on the selection in the Collect Files on Export chooser (see ). You can then type in a new name for the clip or confirm the one suggested by Live with.

    Live Clips are a great way of storing your ideas for later use or development, as they save not only the original clip, including all its clip and envelope settings, but also the original track’s devices. In order to recreate a Live Clip’s device chain, either drag it into a track containing no clips or devices, or ableton live 10 standard Archives s it into the space in the Session or Arrangement View containing no tracks. Note that Live Clips that are imported into tracks already containing devices or clips will appear with their clip settings but not their devices. You could, for instance, drop a bassline Live Clip on an existing track that drives a bass instrument, rather than creating a new track.

    Clips belonging to any Live Sets already on disk are also Live Clips. Please see the section on merging Sets (see ) for more on this topic.

    Note that storing default clip settings with a sample’s analysis file is different from saving a Live Clip. The default clip in the file annotates the sample with sensible default values (warp, gain and pitch settings) so that it will play in a defined way when it is added to a Set. Live Clips, on the other hand, are stored on disk as separate musical ideas. For example, you could create a number of variations from the same audio clip by using different warp, pitch, envelope and effect settings, and store them all as separate Live Clips. In the browser, you could then independently sort and preview these clips, even though they are all referring to the same source sample.

    Live Sets

    The type of document that you create and work on in Live is called a Live Set. Think of this as a single “song.“ Sets must be saved inside projects, so that Live can keep track of and manage all of the various components of the Live Set: Live Clips, device presets, any samples used, etc.

    Creating, Opening and Saving Sets

    Use the File menu’s New Live Set command to create new Live Sets, and the Open Live Set or Open Recent Set command to open existing ones. In the browser, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, you can double-click or press on a Live Set to open it.

    The File menu’s Save Live Set command saves the current Live Set exactly as it is, including all clips and settings.

    You can use the Save Live Set As command to save the current Live Set under a different name and/or in a different directory location, or the Save a Copy command to create a copy of the current Live Set with a new name and/or new directory location.

    Merging Sets

    Live makes it easy to merge Sets, which can come in handy when combining work from different versions or pieces. To add all tracks (except the return tracks) from one Live Set into another, drag the Set from the browser into the current Set, and drop it onto any track title bar or into the drop area next to or below the tracks. The tracks from the dropped Set will be completely reconstructed, including their clips in the Session and Arrangement View, their devices, and their automation.

    If you prefer to import individual tracks from a Set, you can unfold the Live Set in the browser just as if it were a folder.

    You can now drag the individual tracks and drop them as described at the beginning of this section. Any grooves (see Chapter 13) that were saved with your Set are also available as a folder within the unfolded Set.

    You can also drag Group Tracks (see ) and nested Group Tracks from Live’s browser. Group Tracks can be expanded in the browser, allowing you to load an individual track from within.

    In addition to unfolding Sets, you can further unfold the tracks within the Sets to access the individual Session View clips that were used on the track:

    You can browse, preview and import Session View clips from the Set as if they had been stored as individual Live Clips. This means that any Live Set can serve as a pool of sounds for any other, suggesting creative reuse and crossover.

    Exporting Session Clips as New Sets

    You can export a selection of Session View clips as a new Live Set by dragging them to the browser. To export a Set, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, first click and drag, or use the or (PC) / (Mac) modifiers, to select more than one Session View clip. Then, simply drag and drop the clips into the Current Project or any user folder, where you can either confirm Live’s suggested name or type in one of your own.

    Template Sets

    Use the File menu’s Save Live Set As Default Set command to save the current Live Set as the default template. Live will use these settings as the initialized, default state for new Live Sets. You can use this to pre-configure:

    • Your ableton live 10 standard Archives s input/output setup.
    • Preset devices, like EQs and Compressors, in every track.
    • Computer key mappings (see ).
    • MIDI mappings (see ).

    Note that any Live Set in Live’s browser can be set as the default Live Set via the Set Default Live Set context menu entry.

    In addition to this “master” default template, you can create additional template Sets for different types of projects, each with their own unique configuration of tracks, devices, etc. To do this, save the current Live Set using the File menu’s Save Live Set As Template command. Any Sets saved as a template will appear in the browser’s Templates category and the Templates folder in the User Library. (Note that the User Library’s Templates folder is automatically created the first time a template Set is saved.) These Sets will then function as templates: they will load with the configuration you saved, but with the name alloverlimo.us, ready to be used as a new Set.

    Viewing and Changing a Live Set’s File References

    To view a list of the files referenced by the current Live Set, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Set button, and then click the View Files button. Live will display one line for each file used by the Live Set. To ableton live 10 standard Archives s all clips or instruments in the Live Set where the file is actually used, click the triangle to expand the line. Here is what you can do:

    • Replace a file — Dragging a file from the browser and dropping it on an entry in the list makes the Live Set reference the new file instead of the old one. For samples used in audio clips, Live retains the clip properties; the Warp Markers are kept if the new sample has the same or a greater length as the old sample and discarded otherwise. Please note that replacing a sample will change all clips in your set that reference this sample.
    • Hot-swap files — Using the Hot-Swap button at the left-hand side of each entry, you can quickly browse through alternatives for the file that is currently being referenced. This is like dragging files here, only quicker.
    • Edit a referenced sample — using an external application (which can be chosen in the Preferences’ File/Folder tab). Clicking the Edit button will open the referenced sample in the external ableton live 10 standard Archives s. The sample will remain offline as long as the Edit switch is engaged. For samples used in audio clips, the current set of Warp Markers is retained only if the sample length remains the same as before. Note that the Edit button is only available for samples, not for other types of files such as Max for Live devices (see Chapter 27).
    • View a file’s location — The Ableton live 10 standard Archives s column states if a file is missing (see ), or if it resides in your User Library, a Project or somewhere else (“external“). When unfolded, the entry shows the specific places in the Set where the file is used.

    Live Projects

    A Live Project is a folder containing Live-related files that belong together. Consider, for example, work on a piece of music: You start out with an empty Live Set; you record audio and thereby create new sample files; you drag in samples from collections; you save different versions of the Live Set along the way so that you can go back and compare. Perhaps you also save Live Clips or device presets that “belong“ to this particular musical piece. The project folder for this Live Project will maintain all the files related to this piece of music — and Live’s File Manager will provide the tools you need to manage them (see ).

    Projects and Live Sets

    When you save a Live Set under a new name or in a new folder location, Live will create a new project folder and store the Live Set there — unless you are saving the Live Set into an existing Live Project. Let’s look at an example to illustrate this process:

    We have recorded some audio into a new Live Set. We now save the Live Ableton live 10 standard Archives s under the name “Tango“ on the Desktop. The Desktop is available in the browser because we have previously added it as a user folder. Here is the result as displayed by the Live browser:

    The project folder (“Tango Project“) contains the Live Set (“alloverlimo.us“) and a Samples folder, which in turn contains a Recorded folder with two samples in it. Note that the current Project is also indicated in the title bar of Live’s application window.

    Next, we record another track into our Project. We save the modified version of the Live Set under a new name so that we do not lose the previous version. Accepting the Save As command’s default suggestion, we store the new version of the song in the Tango Project folder.

    The Tango Project now contains two Live Sets, and its Samples/Recorded folder contains the samples used by both of them.

    And now for something completely different: We choose the File menu’s New Live Set command and record a samba tune. As this has nothing to do with our tango dabblings, we decide to save it outside the Tango Project folder, say on the Desktop. Live creates a new project folder named Samba Project next to Tango Project.

    So far we have seen how to create Live Projects and save versions of Live Sets into them. How do we open a Project? Simply by opening any of its contained Live Sets. Double-clicking “Tango with alloverlimo.us“ opens that Ableton live 10 standard Archives s and the associated Project — as displayed in Live’s title bar.

    Let’s suppose that, in the course of our work on “Tango with alloverlimo.us,“ we get sidetracked: The piece evolves towards something entirely different, and we feel that it should live in a Project of its own. So, we “Save As“ under a new name and in some location outside the current Project, say the Desktop:

    Note that the new project folder has no Samples folder (yet). “Electro with alloverlimo.us“ is still referencing the piano sample from the original Tango Project. There is nothing wrong with this except for when the Tango Project is moved away or deleted; then “Tango with alloverlimo.us“ will be missing samples. You can prevent this by collecting external files (see ). Even after the fact, Live’s tools for searching missing files (see ) can help solve this problem.

    There is actually no need to keep a Project’s Live Set exactly one level below the Project itself. Within a project folder, you can create any number of sub-folders and move files around to organize them as desired, although you many need to use the File Manager to “teach“ the Project about the changes you’ve made (see ).

    In general, Live will do what it can to prevent situations such as orphaned (Project-less) Live Sets, which have the potential of confusing both the user and Live’s file management tools. It cannot, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, however, control situations in which Sets or files are moved out of order and become disorganized via the Explorer (Windows)/Finder (Mac).

    A note for users of older Live versions: Live does not allow overwriting Live Sets that were created by older major versions to prevent compatibility problems. Instead, you will be requested to “Save As“. Doing this will insure that the newly saved Live Sets reside in project folders.

    Projects and Presets

    By default, new instrument and effect presets are stored in your current Project. At times however, it may make more sense to save a preset to another folder or to your User Library, so that you can access them from other Projects. You can drag a preset between folders after saving it (see ), or simply drag the title bar of the device over a folder in the sidebar, wait for the content pane to open, and then drop it into the content pane, adding it to the folder.

    When saving presets that contain samples to a new location, Live may copy the samples depending on the settings in the Collect Files on Export chooser in the Library Preferences. You can then type in a new name for the device or confirm the one suggested by Live with.

    Managing Files in a Project

    Live’s File Manager offers several convenient tools for managing Projects. Once you’ve opened a Live Set that is part of the Project you wish to manage, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, and then click the Manage Project button. The File Manager will present you with an overview of the Project’s contents and tools for:

    • locating files that the Project is missing;
    • collecting external files into the Project (see ) ;
    • listing unused files in the Project (see ) ;
    • packing a Project in Pack format (see ) ;

    Locating Missing Files

    If you load a Live Set, Live Clip or preset that references files which are missing from their referenced locations, Live’s Status Bar (located at the bottom of the main screen) will display a warning message. Clips and instrument sample slots that reference missing samples will appear marked “Offline,“ and Live will play silence instead of the missing samples.

    Live’s File Manager offers tools for repairing these missing links. Click on the Status Bar message to access these. (This is actually a shortcut for choosing the Manage Files command from the File menu, clicking the Manage Set button, and ableton live 10 standard Archives s clicking the Locate button found in the Missing Files section.) The File Manager will present you with a list of the missing files and associated controls.

    Manual Repair

    To manually fix a broken file reference, locate the missing file in the browser, drag it over to the File Manager and drop it on the respective line in the list of missing files. Note that Live will not care if the file you offer is really the file that was missing.

    Automatic Repair

    Live offers a convenient automatic search function for repairing file references. To send Live on a search, click the Automatic Search section’s Go button. To reveal detailed options for guiding the automatic search function, click the neighboring triangular-shaped button.

    • Search Folder — includes a user-defined folder, as well as any sub-folders, in the search, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. To select the folder, click the associated Set Folder button.
    • Search Project — includes this Set’s project folder in the search.
    • Search Library — includes the Live Library in the search.

    For each missing file, the automatic search function may find any number of candidates. Let’s consider the following cases:

    • No candidate found — you can choose another folder and try again, or locate the sample manually.
    • One candidate found — Live accepts the candidate and considers the problem solved.
    • Several candidates found — Live requires your assistance: Click the Hot-Swap button (i.e., the leftmost item in every line of the list of missing files) to have the browser present the candidates in Hot-Swap Mode. You can now double-click the candidates in the browser to load them, as the music plays if you like.

    Collecting External Files

    To prevent a Live Set from containing broken file references, Live provides the option of collecting (i.e., copying) them into the Set’s project folder. This is accomplished via the File Manager:

    • Choose the Manage Files command from the File menu
    • Click the Manage Set button
    • Unfold the triangular-shaped fold button in the External Files section.

    Separated by location (other Projects, the User Library, installed by factory Packs, and elsewhere — sample collections from external drives, for example), the File Manager provides:

    • A file count and the associated disk space used;
    • A Show button that will list the files in the browser;
    • A Yes/No toggle for engaging or disengaging collection.

    Note: Make sure to confirm your choices by clicking the File Manager’s Collect and Save button!

    The File menu’s Collect All and Save command is a shortcut that collects and saves all external files referenced by the current Set, including those from Live’s Core Library or other installed Packs. Note that this can cause a lot of copying, especially if your Live Set uses large multisample collections!

    Collect Files on Export

    When you save Live Clips, device presets or tracks by dragging them into the Browser, Live manages the copying of associated files based on the selection made in the Collect Files on Export chooser in the Library Preferences. This chooser provides the following options:

    • Always, the default setting, will copy files into the same folder as the clip, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, preset, or track without notification.
    • When Ask is selected, Live provides a dialog box with options for copying files.
    • Never means that files will not ableton live 10 standard Archives s copied when saving.

    Aggregated Locating and Collecting

    Instead of having to deal with problems while you are in a creative mode, you might prefer putting aside some dedicated housekeeping time to solve all the problems in one go. Using Live’s File Manager, you can find missing files and collect external files not only for the current Live Set but also for:

    • The User Library — choose the Manage Files command from the File menu; then click the Manage User Library button.
    • The current Live Project — choose the Manage Files command from the File menu; then click the Manage Project button.
    • Any Live Project — (PC) / -(Mac) on a Project in the browser’s content pane, and choose the Manage Project option.
    • Any selection of Live Sets, Live Clips, Live Presets — (PC) / -(Mac) on the respective items in the browser, and choose the Manage Files command, ableton live 10 standard Archives s.

    Remember to click the Collect and Save button at the bottom of the File Manager when you are finished. Otherwise your changes will be discarded.

    Finding Unused Files

    Live’s File Manager can find the unused files in a Project for you. You can then review them and decide to delete them individually or collectively. When searching for “unused“ files, Live will inspect each file in a Project folder, checking if it is referenced by any of the Live Sets, Live Clips or device presets in the Project. If not, the file is regarded as unused — even if other Projects or programs still use it.

    To find the unused files for the currently open Project, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Project button, and then click on the triangular-shaped fold button next to “Unused Files“ to access a summary and the Show button. Clicking the Show button makes the browser list the unused files; there, you can preview samples (see ) and delete them if you like.

    Note you can also find the unused files from the Library: choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, then click the Manage Library button, and then see the Unused Files section.

    Last but not least, you can find the unused files for all Projects found in a specific folder (and its sub-folders): (PC) / -(Mac) on a folder in the browser and choose the Manage Projects command, then see the Unused Files section, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. Live inspects each Project individually and labels a file unused even if another Projects in the same folder does use that file. To prevent losses, you may want to first collect the files into their respective Projects and then purge the Projects of unused files.

    Packing Projects into Packs

    Live’s File Manager provides the option of packing a Live Project in Pack format for convenient archiving and transfer. To do this, choose the Manage Files command from the File menu, click the Manage Project button, and then click on the triangular-shaped fold button next to “Packing.“ Click the Create Pack button to bring up a file-select dialog where you can specify the name and location of a new Pack file. Creating a new Pack from a Project does not affect the Project. If you want the Project deleted, you can delete it using the browser.

    Live employs lossless compression techniques to minimize the file size of Packs. Depending on the audio materials in a Project, this saves up to 50 percent in file size.

    To unpack a Pack (i.e., to restore the original Live Project), double-click the Pack file (.alp), drag it into the Live main window, or locate it via the File menu’s Install Pack command.

    File Management FAQs

    How Do I Create a Project?

    A Project is automatically created whenever you save a Live Set, except when you save it into a preexisting Project, ableton live 10 standard Archives s.

    How Can I Save Presets Into My Current Project?

    You can save presets directly to the current project by dragging from the device’s title bar and dropping into the Current Project label in the browser. You can then use the File Management tools, collect any referenced samples, ableton live 10 standard Archives s, etc.

    Can I Work On Multiple Versions of a Set?

    If you’d like to work on different versions of the same Live Set, save them into the same Project. This will usually be the Project that was created when you saved the first version of the Live Set. If a Project contains multiple Live Sets it will only collect one copy of any samples used by the various versions, which can save disk space and help with organization.

    Where Should I Save My Live Sets?

    You can save Live Sets anywhere you want, but saving to pre-existing Project folders can cause problems, and should be reserved for special cases. You should only save a Live Set to an existing Project if it is somehow related to the Project — ableton live 10 standard Archives s example, an alternate version of a song that’s already in the Project.

    Can I Use My Own Folder Structure Within a Project Folder?

    You can organize your files any way you want within a Project, but you’ll need to use the File Manager to relink the files that you’ve moved around:

    1. In Live’s Browser or via your operating system, reorganize the files and folders within your Project folder.
    2. Navigate to the Project folder in the Browser and choose Manage Project via the (PC) / -(Mac) context menu.
    3. If you’ve changed the original location of any samples used in the Project, the Missing Samples section of the File Manager will indicate this. Click the Locate button to search for the samples.
    4. Since you know that your samples are all in the Project folder, unfold Automatic Search. Then enable the Search Project and Fully Rescan Folders options, ableton live 10 standard Archives s. Finally, click Go to initiate the search.
    5. When searching is complete, click Collect and Save at the bottom of the File Manager to update the Project.
    Источник: [alloverlimo.us]
    Ableton". alloverlimo.us. Retrieved
  12. ^"The Covert Operators - Ableton Live Packs". Archived from the original on Retrieved
  13. ^"Puremagnetik". Archived from the original on 16 December Retrieved
  14. ^"Hands-on with Ableton Live 9: Audio to MIDI". MusicRadar. Archived from the original on Retrieved
  15. ^Tusa, Scott. "Getting Started with Ableton Live". O'Reilly Digital Media. Archived from the original on Retrieved

External links[edit]

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Category Archives: Ableton Live Tips

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Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Fast, fluid and flexible software for music creation and performance.

Live 10 introduces four bold devices, new features and improvements that keep you in the flow, and an expanded sound library. Plus, a built-in Max for Live, extended Push features and much more.

Key Features - Live 10 Standard:

• Unlimited Audio and MIDI tracks
• Unlimited Scenes
• 12 Send and Return tracks
• mono audio input channels
• mono audio output channels
• Capture
• Complex warp modes
• Audio-slicing
• Audio to MIDI
• + Sounds (10+ GB)
• 5 Software Instruments
• 34 Audio Effects
• 8 MIDI Effects

What extras come in the box?

• A USB Stick with your Live 10 installer and included Packs

System Requirements

PC
• Windows 7 (SP1), Windows 8 or Windows 10 (bit)
• bit Intel Core or AMD multi-core processor (Intel Core processor or faster recommended)
• 4 GB RAM (8 GB or more recommended)
• x display resolution
• ASIO compatible audio hardware for Link support (also recommended for optimal audio performance)
• USB port (USB or better) for program installation
• Access to an internet connection for authorizing Live (for downloading additional content and updating Live, a fast internet connection is recommended)
• Approximately 3 GB disk space on the system drive for the basic installation (8 GB free disk space recommended)
• Up to 76 GB disk space for additionally available sound content

Mac
• OS X or later
• Intel Core2 Duo Processor (Intel Core i5 processor or faster recommended)
• 4 GB RAM (8 GB or more recommended)
• x display resolution
• Core Audio compliant audio interface recommended
• USB port (USB or better) for program installation
• Access to an internet connection for authorizing Ableton live 10 standard Archives s (for downloading additional content and updating Live, a fast internet connection is recommended)
• Approximately 3 GB disk space on the system drive for the basic installation (8 GB free disk space recommended)
• Up to 76 GB disk space for additionally available sound content

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