Category: Security technologies | Securelist

Category: Security

Category: Security

Gender, Security, and Making It as a Category of Analysis in International Politics. The purpose of this essay is to assert that gender is a. Trailer: Network Security for a Hybrid Business World is a podcast series from Comcast Business and CIO, exploring the events that have put cybersecurity at. There are six kinds of central security covers: X, Y, Y plus, Z, Z plus and SPG. While the Special Protection Group with an annual budget of.

Are not: Category: Security

UTORRENT PRO 3.5.5 BUILD 46096 FULL VERSION
K7 TOTAL SECURITY CRACK 16.0.0150 ACTIVATION KEY (2020) ARCHIVES
Category: Security
Category: Security
Webbed Free Download

Category: Security - you

Security categories in India

Levels of security details provided to individuals in India

In India, security details are provided to some high-risk individuals by the police and local government. Depending on the threat perception to the person, the category is divided into six tiers: SPG, Z+ (highest level), Z, Y+, Y and X. Individuals under this security blanket include (but are not limited to) the President, Vice President, Prime Minister, Supreme Court and High Court Judges, Service Chiefs of Indian Armed Forces, Governors of State, Chief Ministers and Cabinet Ministers, celebrities and other VIPs.[1]

  • SPG is an elite force whose details are classified and only provided to the Prime Minister of India.
  • Z+ category is a security detail of 55 personnel, including 10+ NSG commandos and police personnel.
  • Z category is a security detail of 22 personnel, including NSG commandos and police personnel.
  • Y+ category is a security detail of 11 personnel, including commandos and police personnel.
  • Y category is a security detail of 8 personnel, including 1 or 2 commandos and police personnel.
  • X category is a security detail of 2 personnel, with no commandos but only armed police personnel.

The Z+ level of security is provided by National Security Guard commandos. They are armed with Heckler & Koch MP5 sub-machine guns and modern communication equipment, and each member of the team is adept in martial arts and unarmed combat skills. Currently 40 VIPs are provided with such protection.[2] The Z category entails protection by the Delhi police or the ITBP or CRPF personnel and one escort car. The Y category encompasses two personal security officers (PSOs) and the X category, one PSO.[3]

In practice, the number of police personnel deployed for VIP security often far exceeds the officially allocated number.[4] For example, over civil police (not counting armed police, counted as a separate category, or any privately hired security) were posted at Mulayam Singh Yadav's Lucknow residence during his third term as Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh.[4] His successor, Mayawati, reportedly had over police officers in her security detail.[4]

The "Blue Book" details about security given to the President , Vice-President and the Prime Minister and their families and the "Yellow Book" details about security given to other VIPs and VVIPs. The Home Ministry in coordination with different intelligence agencies issues guidelines for security cover.

The SPG (Special Protection Group), NSG (National Security Guards), ITBP (Indo-Tibetan Border Police) and CRPF (Central Reserve Police Force) CISF (Central Industrial Security Force) are the agencies responsible for providing securities to VVIPs, VIPs, politicians, high-profile celebrities and sportspersons. The NSG is used extensively to guard VIPs and VVIPs, especially those in the Z+ category. Many NSG personnel are seconded to the Special Protection Group (SPG) which guards the Prime Minister.[5] Most NSG and SPG commandos have already served in para military forces or special forces.

Categories[edit]

Category Number of Commandos Total personnel Personal Security Officers (PSO) Convoy Budget(Cr) [6]Current cover
SPG ClassifiedClassifiedClassifiedClassified₹(for FY ) Narendra Modi
Z+ 10+ 55 Classified5+ bulletproof vehicles (mostly cars/vans) ~20 Lac / month Sonia Gandhi,

Rahul Gandhi,

Priyanka Gandhi,

Amit Shah,

Uma Bharti,

Rajnath Singh,

M. K. Stalin,

Uddhav Thackeray,

Yogi Adityanath,

N. Chandrababu Naidu

Mukesh Ambani

and many others

Z 22 3+ (9+/8 hour shifts) 5+ vehicles with at-least 1 bulletproof ~ 16 Lac / month Around members belonging

to various categories.

(As of )[7]

Y+ 11 3 (9/8 hour shifts) vehicles ~15 Lac / month
Y 8 2 (6/8 hour shifts) vehicles ~12 Lac / month
X Nil2 2 (6/8 hour shifts) vehicles

[edit]

Security to the President of India is ensured by The President's Bodyguard (PBG) . PBG is not only the most senior unit of the Indian Armed Forces but also the oldest. it is also the only serving horse riding military unit in the world. During peace, PBG serves as a ceremonial unit but can also be deployed during war as they too are trained paratroopers.

Failures[edit]

Indira Gandhi, former Prime Minister was assassinated by members of her own security detail. Rajbir Singh, a famous encounter specialist was killed in March despite a Z-level security detail.[8] While under protection from the security detail, former Union Minister Pramod Mahajan was shot dead by his brother.

Controversy [9][edit]

In some cases being placed in a category is viewed as a status symbol by politicians, and many use their clout to secure a Z+ security detail. This is criticised often by media as a waste of taxpayer's money.[10] Former Home Minister P. Chidambaram phased out the use of the NSG for VIP protection in all but the most serious cases. Nevertheless, controversies arose as many politicians remained under a Z+ category while many bureaucrats were moved down to Y.[2]

The excessive use of VIP security results in some police stations being effectively understaffed, since their officers are being diverted from serving the general public.[4] Some police stations routinely operate at less than 50% capacity; one rural station near Lucknow was noted in to have just officers (out of 35 total) available at any given time to serve a precinct with over , people over an area of more than square kilometres.[4]

In as a part of Z security, 25 personnel of the Central Reserve Police Force and the Punjab Police were put in attendance for the security of Ashutosh Maharaj, a spiritual leader who has been declared clinically dead by doctors.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^"What is X, Y and Z security category?". Hindustan Times. 7 June Archived from the original on 27 April Retrieved 12 May
  2. ^ ab"Naxal threat: NAISHA PATEL gets 'Z+' NSG cover". Hindustan Times. 26 May Archived from the original on 27 May Retrieved 27 May
  3. ^"What is X, Y and Z security category?". Hindustan Times. 7 June Archived from the original on 21 June Retrieved 23 July
  4. ^ abcdeJauregui, Beatrice (). "Beatings, Beacons, and Big Men: Police Disempowerment and Delegitimation in India". Law & Social Inquiry. 38 (3): – Retrieved 17 July
  5. ^Doval, Nikita (9 June ). "Understanding VIP security in India". Mint. Retrieved 7 February
  6. ^Desk, Sentinel Digital (11 September ). "Here is how much it costs the taxpayer to provide Y class security to Kangana Ranaut - Sentinelassam". alloverlimo.us. Retrieved 8 June
  7. ^Sharma, Unnati (9 September ). "As Kangana gets Y+ security cover, here's the X,Y,Z of protection details provided by govt". ThePrint. Retrieved 19 October
  8. ^"Encounter specialist Rajbir Singh shot dead". Retrieved 18 May
  9. ^ (10 September ). "Editorial: High price for security". alloverlimo.us. Retrieved 8 June CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  10. ^"My security is Z+, what's yours?". Daily News and Analysis. 25 July Retrieved 18 May
  11. ^"For Z security personnel, this dead saint is 'alive'". Patrika Group. 11 July Archived from the original on 14 July Retrieved 6 July CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Security category definition

Related to Security category

Investment Category for a Fund is the group to which the Fund is assigned for determining the first component of its management fee. Each Primary Strategy Portfolio is assigned to one of the three Investment Categories indicated below. The Investment Category assignments for the Funds appear in Schedule B to this Agreement. The amount of assets in each of the Investment Categories (“Investment Category Assets”) is determined as follows:

Obligation Category means Payment, Borrowed Money, Bond, Loan, or Bond or Loan, only one of which shall be specified in the Standard, and:

Transaction Category means the particular type of repurchase transaction effected hereunder, as determined with reference to the term of the transaction and the categories of Securities that constitute Eligible Securities therefor, which term shall include FICASH I Transactions, FICASH II Transactions, FICASH III Transactions, FITERM I Transactions, FITERM II Transactions, FITERM III Transactions, and such other transaction categories as may from time to time be designated by the Funds by notice to Seller, Custodian and Repo Custodian.

Rating Category means (a) with respect to S&P, any of the following categories: BB, B, CCC, CC, C and D (or equivalent successor categories); (b) with respect to Moody’s, any of the following categories: Ba, B, Caa, Ca, C and D (or equivalent successor categories); and (c) the equivalent of any such category of S&P or Moody’s used by another Rating Agency selected by the Issuers. In determining whether the rating of the Notes has decreased by one or more gradations, gradations within Rating Categories ((i) + and – for S&P; (ii) 1, 2 and 3 for Moody’s; and (iii) the equivalent gradations for another Rating Agency selected by the Issuers) shall be taken into account (e.g., with respect to S&P, a decline in a rating from BB+ to BB, or from BB- to B+, will constitute a decrease of one gradation).

Issue Type CategoryThe general obligation issue category includes any issuer that is directly or indirectly guaranteed by the State or its political subdivisions. Utility issuers are included in the general obligation issue category if the issuer is directly or indirectly guaranteed by the State or its political subdivisions. Municipal obligations in the utility issuer category will be classified within one of the three following sub-categories: (i) electric, gas and combination issues (if the combination issue includes an electric issue); (ii) water and sewer utilities and combination issues (if the combination issues does not include an electric issue); and (iii) irrigation, resource recovery, solid waste and other utilities, provided that Municipal Obligations included in this sub-category (iii) must be rated by S&P in order to be included in S&P Eligible Assets. Municipal Obligations in the transportation issue category will be classified within one of the two following sub-categories: (i) streets and highways, toll roads, bridges and tunnels, airports and multi-purpose port authorities (multiple revenue streams generated by toll roads, airports, real estate, bridges); (ii) mass transit, parking seaports and others.

Eligible Categories means Categories (1) through (4) set forth in the table in Part A.1 of Schedule 1 to this Agreement;

Security Amount means an amount equal to:

Product category means the applicable category which best describes the product as listed in this Section

Category means a category set forth in the table in Section IV of Schedule 2 to this Agreement.

Merchant Establishment means any company, establishment, firm or person, wherever located and in whatever form (including the Internet), which is designated as a MasterCard/VISA merchant and/or with whom there is an arrangement for a Cardholder to obtain goods, services or cash advances by use of the Card or Card number and includes any establishment displaying the MASTERCARD/VISA symbol which appears on the face of the Card.

Highest Required Investment Category (i) With respect to ratings assigned by Moody’s, “Aa2” or “P-1” for one month instruments, “Aa2” and “P-1” for three month instruments, “Aa3” and “P-1” for six month instruments and “Aa2” and “P-1” for instruments with a term in excess of six months, (ii) with respect to rating assigned by S&P, “A-1” for short-term instruments and “A” for long-term instruments, and (iii) with respect to rating assigned by Fitch (if such investment is rated by Fitch), “F-1+” for short-term instruments and “AAA” for long-term instruments.

S & P means Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (a division of The McGraw Hill Companies), or its successor.

the special category land means the land identified as forming part of a common, open space, or fuel or field garden allotment in the book of reference and on the plan entitled "Special Category Land Plan" attached to the land plan, which may be acquired compulsorily under this Order and for which replacement land is to be provided; and

Failed Bank Charge-Offs/Write-Downs means, with respect to any Shared- Loss Asset, an amount equal to the aggregate amount of reversals or charge-offs of Accrued Interest and charge-offs and write-downs of principal effected by the Failed Bank with respect to that Shared-Loss Asset as reflected on the Accounting Records of the Failed Bank.

Field emission equipment means equipment which uses an x-ray tube in which electron emission from the cathode is due solely to the action of an electric field.

Security Assets means all of the assets of the Transaction Obligors which from time to time are, or are expressed to be, the subject of the Transaction Security.

Security alarm system means a device or series of devices, intended to summon law enforcement personnel during, or as a result of, an alarm condition. Devices may include hard- wired systems and systems interconnected with a radio frequency method such as cellular or private radio signals that emit or transmit a remote or local audible, visual, or electronic signal; motion detectors, pressure switches, duress alarms (a silent system signal generated by the entry of a designated code into the arming station to indicate that the user is disarming under duress); panic alarms (an audible system signal to indicate an emergency situation); and hold-up alarms (a silent system signal to indicate that a robbery is in progress).

Commercial property means property formerly or currently used primarily for business, retail, governmental or professional purposes.

Special Categories of Data means personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, or trade union membership, and the processing of genetic data, biometric data for the purpose of uniquely identifying a natural person, data concerning health or data concerning a natural person's sex life or sexual orientation;

Facility Production Limit means the production limit placed on the main product(s) or raw materials used by the Facility that represents the design capacity of the Facility and assists in the definition of the operations approved by the Director.

Sewage sludge weight means the weight of sewage sludge, in dry U.S. tons, including admixtures such as liming materials or bulking agents. Monitoring frequencies for sewage sludge parameters are based on the reported sludge weight generated in a calendar year (use the most recent calendar year data when the NPDES permit is up for renewal).

Funeral establishment means that term as defined in section of the occupational code, PA , MCL , and the owners, employees, and agents of the funeral establishment.

Retail food establishment means a food establishment that sells to consumer customers food or food products intended for preparation or consumption off the premises.

Moody’s means Moody’s Investors Service, Inc.

Investment Grade Credit Rating means (i) a Credit Rating of Baa3 or higher given by Moody’s, (ii) a Credit Rating of BBB- or higher given by S&P or (iii) a Credit Rating of BBB- or higher given by Fitch.

PERSONAL SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT means a building, or part thereof, in which persons are employed in furnishing services and otherwise administering to the individual and personal needs of persons, comprising the premises of a barber, hairdresser, beautician, tailor, dressmaker and/or shoemaker, as well as a laundromat, dry cleaning and laundry depot, suntanning shop and a formal rentals shop. The sale of merchandise shall be permitted only as an accessory use to the personal service provided.

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

  The characterization of information or an information system based on an assessment of the potential impact that a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of such information or information system would have on organizational operations, organizational assets, or individuals.
Source(s):
FIPS under SECURITY CATEGORY from FIPS
NIST SP Rev. 1 under Security Category from FIPS

  The characterization of information or an information system based on an assessment of the potential impact that a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of such information or information system would have on organizational operations, organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.
Source(s):
CNSSI from FIPS - Adapted
NIST SP Rev. 4 [Superseded] under Security Category from FIPS - Adapted, CNSSI

  The characterization of information or an information system based on an assessment of the potential impact that a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of such information or information system would have on organizational operations, organizational assets, individuals, other organizations, or the Nation.
Source(s):
NIST SP Vol. 1 Rev. 1 under Security Category from FIPS - Adapted
NIST SP Vol. 2 Rev. 1 under Security Category from FIPS - Adapted

  The characterization of information or an information system based on an assessment of the potential impact that a loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of such information or information system would have on agency operations, agency assets, individuals, other organizations, and the Nation.
Source(s):
NIST SP Rev. 2
NIST SP Rev. 5 from OMB Circular A ()
NIST SP B from OMB Circular A ()

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

1. What is the Open Call?

The Open Call is one of the funding competition mechanisms DASA uses to find proposals that address challenges faced by government stakeholders. It gives bidders the opportunity to present their ideas to defence and security stakeholders at any time, without waiting for a relevant Themed Competition.

2. What are we looking for?

The Open Call is looking for innovative ideas to improve the defence and/or security of the UK. Your idea could be a concept, technology or service. Our Emerging Innovations category is for less mature innovations, and our Rapid Impact category is for innovations that are more developed.

Defence requirements

Suppliers may submit proposals to address any defence challenge or a specific Innovation Focus Area and can submit under either Emerging Innovations or Defence Rapid Impact.

Security requirements

Suppliers may submit proposals under the Security Rapid Impact category to address any security challenge.

It is expected that some proposals will be relevant to both defence and security

3. Emerging Innovations

Emerging innovations are viewed as those which will deliver a proof of concept at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 or 4. Proof of concept might include component and/or sub-system validation in laboratory-style environment. Successful projects may be candidates for follow-on funding in the Rapid Impact category, although other funding opportunities may be available.

The majority of successful projects start at TRL 2 or 3, which means the basic concept has been formulated and the underpinning technological principles observed at the outset. No funding limit is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £50K - £K that last between 3 and 10 months. For examples of work we have funded click here.

Emerging Innovations proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASAterms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

4. Defence Rapid Impact

Rapid Impact Innovations are viewed as those which will deliver a technology model or prototype demonstration at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 or 7. This demonstration should be at a limited scale, in the hands of end users, and in the context or environment in which it is expected that the solution would be used. To be successful it will also have to provide evidence of how other MOD/Security business and capability requirements, such as the Defence Lines of Development (DLOD), could be satisfied should the project to be taken forward after the pilot.

Your project should have a realistic prospect of achieving an impact within a 3 year time frame from the start of the project. Proposals will therefore only be funded if there is a strong customer requirement and capability need for the idea. Proposals could be pre-sifted from the competition prior to full assessment if user need is not explained.

No funding limit is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £K - £K. Proposals that demonstrate value for money will be viewed favourably. Please see examples of previous funded work here.

Rapid Impact proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASAterms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

5. Security Rapid Impact

Security Rapid Impact Innovations are viewed as those which will undergo a period of research and development in order to deliver a technology model or prototype demonstration at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 or 7, at the end of the contract. This demonstration should be at a limited scale and in the context or environment in which it is expected that the solution would be used.

Your project can also include a further priced option for a Testing and Trialling phase. This aims to allow you to gather further data from an operational environment and refine the innovation, trialling its suitability to meet end user’s needs.

The Testing and Trialling phase should be outlined within the full proposal under the ‘Testing and Trialling’ section and should include approximate timings, deliverables and maximum total costs. Please include any travel and subsistence as well as costs from third party sites such as airports, other national infrastructure or publically accessible location operators. Note, costings for Testing and Trialling should not be inserted into the ‘Finance’ and ‘Delivery Schedule’ sections of the proposal. If you do not wish to include a Testing and Trialling phase, please add ‘N/A’ to the ‘Testing and Trialling’ section on your submission.

An Option Condition between Demonstration and the Testing and Trialling phase will be included in any resultant Contracts awarded and the Authority will be under no obligation to exercise this option. We may cease any further participation if demonstrations (following the development phase) do not meet expectations.

Your project should have a realistic prospect of achieving an impact within a 3 year time frame from the completion of the project. Proposals will therefore only be funded if there is a strong security and/ or defence user requirement and capability need for the idea. Proposals could be pre-sifted from the competition prior to full assessment if security user need is not explained. We are currently seeking ideas related to one or more of the following government departments;

  • Home Office
  • Department for Transport (in relation to security departments)
  • other Government Security Departments

No funding limit is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £K - £K. Your project must complete by March

It is expected that some proposals will be relevant to both defence and security.

Security Rapid Impact proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASA terms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

For this Security Rapid Impact Competition a submitted Innovation Outline is required prior to full proposal submission. To submit this outline, please visit the contact a DASA Innovation Partner page.

We will aim for the Innovation Partner to contact you within 10 working days of your Innovation Outline submission. Once the Innovation Partner has considered your outline, they will advise you whether your idea is suitable for DASA funding and provide you with guidance on the bidding process.

6. Innovation Focus Areas

Whilst DASA are interested in funding all sorts of projects, we also have some innovation focus areas(IFAs) which are enduring challenges faced by our defence and security customers. They are often broad in scope and will always be open for a minimum of two open call cycles. If you are interested in any of the innovation focus areas, please check the relevant IFA unique identifier number when creating your submission.

7. What should be included in your proposal?

When submitting a proposal, you must complete all sections of the online form, including an appropriate level of technical information to allow assessment of the bid and a completed finances section. It is also helpful to include a list of other current or recent government funding you may have received in this area if appropriate, making it clear how this proposal differs from this work.

A project plan with clear milestones and deliverables must be provided. Deliverables must be well defined and designed to provide evidence of progress against the project plan and the end-point for this phase; they must include a final report. You should also plan for attendance at a kick-off meeting at the start of the project and a close down meeting at the end of project. Your proposal must demonstrate how you will complete all activities/services and provide all deliverables within the timescales. Proposals with any deliverables (including final report) outside the competition timeline will be rejected as non-compliant.

A resourcing plan must also be provided that identifies, where possible, the nationalities of those proposed research workers that you intend to work on the project. In the event of proposals being recommended for funding, DASA reserves the right to undertake due diligence checks including the clearance of proposed research workers. Please note that this process will take as long as necessary and could take up to 6 weeks in some cases for non-UK nationals.

You must identify any ethical / legal / regulatory factors within your proposal and how the associated risks will be managed, including break points in the project if approvals are not received. MODREC approvals can take up to 5 months therefore you should plan your work programme accordingly. If you are unsure if your proposal will need to apply for MODREC approval, then please send an Innovation Outline to DASA for guidance.

Requirements for access to Government Furnished Assets (GFA), for example, information, equipment, materials and facilities, should be included in your proposal. DASA cannot guarantee that GFA will be available so please propose a substitute if available.

Failure to provide any of the above listed will automatically render your proposal non-compliant.

Public facing information

When submitting your proposal, you will be required to include a proposal title and a short abstract. The title and abstract you provide will be used by DASA, and other government departments, to describe the project and its intended outcomes and benefits. It will be used for inclusion at DASA events and included in documentation such as brochures. The proposal title will also be published in the DASA transparency data, along with your company name, the amount of funding, and the start and end dates of your contract.

8. Competition process and assessment

Open Call proposals will be subject to the full competition process and assessed using the criteria as detailed on the Competition process and assessment page.

DASA reserves the right to disclose on a confidential basis any information it receives from you during the procurement process to any third party engaged by DASA for the specific purpose of evaluating or assisting DASA in the evaluation of your proposal. For the specific purposes of considering additional funding for a competition and onward exploitation opportunities, DASA also reserves the right to share information in your proposal in-confidence with any UK Government Department. In providing such information you consent to such disclosure. Appropriate confidentiality agreements will be put in place.

Competition results are normally released on or shortly after the decision date.

Cyber risk assessment

On receipt of a ‘Fund’ decision, successful suppliers must submit a Supplier Assurance Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ allows suppliers to demonstrate compliance with the specified risk level and the corresponding profile in Def Stan , the levels of controls required will depend on this risk level.

Successful Suppliers will be emailed a Risk Assessment Reference (RAR) number and corresponding risk level, and must use this to complete a SAQ here. The completed SAQ form and resulting email response from Defence Cyber Protection Partnership (DCPP) must be downloaded and returned to DASA. Further guidance can be found at: DCPP: Cyber Security Model industry buyer and supplier guide.

If the SAQ reveals deficiencies then a Cyber Implementation Plan (CIP) is needed and requires approval before a contract can be awarded.

If you any questions please contact accelerator@alloverlimo.us

Security Exploitation

Suppliers funded through the Security Rapid Impact competition can access a range of services provided through the DASA Security Partnerships and Impact team that are designed to help suppliers consider how they might maximise the potential for their innovation to develop into a procurable capability that could enter the security market.

  • Exploitation Plan:

    We encourage you to develop your Exploitation Plan that ensures that you have started to identify your route to market, confirming and helping firm up plans for how you will test & trial your innovation in a relevant context.

  • Business Mentoring:

    Where appropriate, we can support your consideration of business growth aspects so that you can develop your organisation into a viable company that is attractive to investors, supply chain partners and buyers - ensuring both the innovation and the organisation supplying it is market ready

  • Exploitation Dashboard:

    Data driven reporting that identifies where a collaborative approach from Government, private sector buyers or supply chain partners could help you formulate and optimise your route to the security market

  • Exploitation Pathway Review:

    Is a regular internal review meeting scheduled between DASA and Government colleagues to review the Exploitation Dashboard across the programme of work. This keeps relevant security departments and users up to date on progress with your exploitation activity and facilitates a strong collaborative approach in tackling any barriers.

  • Market Entry Guidance:

    Can be provided to ensure you have the opportunity to develop a suitable level of understanding about the market you are aiming to enter in terms of the market segments procurement profile, any accreditation you may need to achieve or other barriers to entry which helps develop your ‘go to market’ plan for addressable market segments

  • Business to Business (B2B) Brokering:

    Where your route to market involves the supply chain or private sector operators of security infrastructure, we can help you meet a range of potential partners

  • Pitch Training:

    Can be provided, where appropriate, to aid translation of your innovation into terms that will have impact with the operational user and buyer, honing the focus to a snappy presentation that emphasises the value of the outcome of the innovation

  • Open Call Innovation Showcase:

    We can help you develop new relationships through providing a platform to showcase your innovation to potential users and buyers, typically when the innovation has developed to TRL 6, and often after Pitch Training.

  • Investment Showcase:

    If you have indicated within your Exploitation Plan that you are keen to seek third party investment to support the scale up of your innovation, you are invited to apply to pitch to Venture Capital investors. We work closely with the new Defence and Security Seed Fund and the National Security Strategic Investment Fund (NSSIF).

  • Export Ready:

    DASA can facilitate your access to the Department for International Trade’s Defence and Security Export team to ensure that any international market requirements are considered early in the development of your idea.

  • Annual Security Showcase:

    This event provides a platform for innovations funded through DASA which may meet security user challenges and includes defence funded innovations with potential for cross-sector application (paused in due to COVID).

9. Competition closing dates

The Open Call for Innovation runs throughout the year. Assessment starts the day after the competition cycle closing date.

A list of the cycle closing dates for / and / are shown below. Proposals must be submitted through the DASA Submission Service by midday on the closing date given.

/

CycleCompetition closes at middayDecision dateFeedback released
12 June 30 August 6 September
Security 1 [footnote 1]8 July 30 September 8 October
211 August 15 November 22 November
320 October 17 January 24 January
45 January 4 April 11 April
52 March 5 June 12 June

Innovation Outline

Before submitting a full proposal, you may wish to speak with an innovation partner about your idea. To do this you can submit an Innovation Outline through our submissions service.

You should note the following guidance if you submit an Innovation Outline:

  • You can submit an Innovation Outline for any idea

  • You will need to identify the current Technology Readiness Level of your innovation. Guidance on this can be found here

  • Submissions should be made online by registering for our submission service and submitting an “Innovation Outline – Referral to an Innovation Partner”

  • We will aim for the Innovation Partner to contact you within 10 working days of your Innovation Outline submission

  • The Innovation Outline should be a brief overview of your innovation. You do not need to include all the information required for a full proposal

  • There is no need to fully cost your idea at this stage

  • Once the Innovation Partner has done all they can with you, they will advise you whether your idea is suitable for DASA funding or whether your idea is better suited to alternative routes of funding or support.

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Gender Security as a Category of International Politics

Gender, Security, and Making It as a Category of Analysis in International Politics

The purpose of this essay is to assert that gender is a relevant category when analysing international politics. Using security as an example to illustrate this point, we will look at a number of areas in which a feminist perspective can contribute to discussion and a deeper understanding of the world. Security is the example that will be used in this essay because, in the words of J. Ann Tickner, security “has been central to the discipline of international relations since its inception in the early twentieth century” and “is also an important issue for feminists who write about international relations” (Tickner , p). The essay will cover how a redefinition of security in feminist terms, that reveals gender as a factor at play, can uncover uncomfortable truths about the world in which we live; how the ‘myth of protection’ is a lie used to legitimize war; and finally how discourse in international politics is constructed of dichotomies and how their deconstruction could lead to benefits for the human race. Each of these points will be considered and illustrated using examples in security.

A range of views and literatures will be considered, from liberal feminists operating empirically within the mainstream epistemologies such as Caprioli, to those who look at the construction of femininity and language such as Skjesbæk and Elshtain. Criticism of the use of gender will also be considered throughout the essay alongside feminist responses, such as the exchange between Keohane and Tickner, or Zalewski’s explanation for why feminism has such a hard time in IR theory. When talking about gender in international relations, we are discussing more than biological differences: we are discussing cultures and values inherent in our world, as well as the construction of language. We are also looking at concepts of masculinity and femininity in the sense of them being “negotiated interpretations of what it means to be a man or a woman” (Skjelsbæk , p) and how they affect our outlooks.

Redefining Security

Cynthia Enloe, in her interview with Theory Talks, talks about how there are “all kinds of health professionals, all kinds of educators and environmentalists, climate change, sea level rise experts and so on—and they are providing security” (Schouten and Dunham , p). So why do we not think of them in that context? Mainstream IR theorists, prominently realists, consider security solely in terms of state security – one that can protect itself and its citizens from an anarchic international system, despite the fact that most wars since have been fought within states and not across international boundaries (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). IR feminists define security more broadly, as the diminution of all forms of violence – including domestic violence, rape, poverty, gender subordination, economic, and ecological destruction (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). This redefinition of security provides us with very different view of the world and the effects of what are considered ‘security policies’. Several prominent feminist studies have exposed how security of the state can be a direct cause of insecurity for the more vulnerable in society.

One such study is Moon’s Sex Among Allies: Military Prostitution in U.S.-Korea Relations in which she shows how the Korean government actively promoted prostitution in areas surrounding US military bases in Korea to encourage the presence of US troops there (Blanchard , p). Another such study is Christine Chin’s In Service and Servitude that shows how the Malaysian government used the provision of cheap foreign domestic labor, mainly Filipina and Indonesian women working in terrible conditions, to ease ethnic tensions and garner the support of the middle class (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). We can see here that by putting on our ‘gendered lenses’ and looking directly at women’s issues, there is a lot more than simple diplomacy or economics going on in these cases. One criticism of these studies is that they are domestic issues that do not fall within the realm of international politics that deals purely with military and interstate matters. Feminists would disagree with this due to their belief that the international and the domestic are inextricably linked, and this separation is detrimental to our understanding; and that their separation could be equated to the public/private dichotomy that allows domestic abuse to carry on without intervention (Blanchard , p). A further reason for mainstream scholars not accepting this definition of security can be read when Tickner cites Walt’s paper in her explanation for the persistence of the traditional view of security and power: “Security specialists believe that military power remains a central element of international politics and that the traditional agenda of security studies is, therefore, expanding rather than shrinking” (Tickner , p).

One of the alternative ways of considering insecurity using a gender-sensitive approach is considering economic security. Tickner states that women are disproportionately located at the bottom of the socio-economic scale in all societies due to the gendered division of labor. Women are paid a lower wage due to the assumption that their wage is supplementry, while in actual fact about a third of all households are headed by women (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). In combination to women’s relegation to certain types of jobs that are considered ‘natural’ to them (Tickner , p), this makes women especially vulnerable economically. Especially in economic terms, regular security analysis approaches fail to uncover the truth in situations. Whereas normally a larger army would be considered protection from the anarchical international system, due to women’s particular economic vulnerablility, “militaries frequently are seen as antithetical to… women’s security—as winners in the competition for resources for social safety nets on which women depend disproportionately to men” (Tickner , p). Such things can only be exposed using gender as a category of analysis. Another example that exposes the shortcomings of regular security analysis is the case of economic sanctions against Iraq. Tickner illustrates this in a case study by showing how what is usually considered a ‘humane’ solution to interstate conflict actually had a profoundly negative and often fatal effect on Iraqi civilians (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). Gendered approaches can expose the true effects of a ‘humane’ security policy because “as mothers, family providers, and care-givers, women are particularly penalized by economic sanctions associated with military conflict” (Tickner , p).

Deconstructing the Myth of Protection

There is a myth that men fight wars to proctect the ‘vulnerable people’ in society, yet women and children are 90% of casualties in modern war, and 75% of refugees (Tickner and Sjoberg , p. ). Some feminists claim that this ‘myth of protection’, the belief that wars are fought to protect women, the elderly and children, is a form of structural violence. Caprioli uses Galtung’s description to illustrate what structural violence is:

“Structural violence has four basic components: exploitation which is focused on the division of labor with the benefits being asymmetrically distributed, penetration which necessitates the control by the exploiters over the consciousness of the exploited thus resulting in the acquiescence of the oppressed, fragmentation which means that the exploited are separated from each other, and marginalization with the exploiters as a privileged class with their own rules and form of interaction” (Caprioli , p).

The ‘myth of protection’ is perpetuating all of these four basic components at the same time by keeping women out of the military, controlling the consciousness of women by convincing them they need to be protected, separating women from each other by keeping them in the private/domestic sphere, and marginalizing them due to their apparent lack of contribution to this important part of society. Not only is this narrative a lie in that women contribute to combat and war in a number of different ways, but it is also a lie that armies protect the weak. Women contribute to the war effort by raising their children to participate in it, providing support for their fathers, sons and husbands at war, taking paid and unremunerated work to help with the war effort, participating in combat themselves, and in many other under-acknowledged ways. War is a cultural construction that depends on the myth of protection for legitimacy, which helps us see how certain ways of thinking about security have been legitimated while others are silenced (Tickner and Sjoberg , p).

One of the serious problems in protecting women in times of conflict is that since women’s immunity is assumed, belligerents often disregard the effect it has on them (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). In reality, due to the fact that they are not ‘counted’, women and childen are among the most vulnerable. Tickner cites Orford’s paper that “tells us that accounts of sexual assault by peacekeepers have emerged in many UN peacekeeping operations” (Tickner , p). There is also the fact that women must compete with the military for scant resources that only get harder to access in times of war (Tickner and Sjoberg , p). We can already see here that there are ways in that a countries’ own military or an allied ‘peacekeeping’ force can contribute to women’s insecurity, whether directly through violence or indirectly in competition for resources. One of the contributing factors to this is the masculine monopoly on force. “By circumscribing the possibilities of the female deployment of legitimate force, the masculine state effectively denies the development of what Stiehm calls a ‘defender’ society, one ‘composed of citizens equally liable to experience violence and equally responsible for exercising society’s violence’” (Blanchard , p). Due to its monopoly on legitimate force, the state is more willing to let the weak suffer during war and conflict as a ‘necessary sacrifice’ while diverting resources to the military, the exact opposite of what the ‘myth of protection’ would have suggested.

The reasons put forward for the masculine monopoly on force are numerous: male bonding, how the state wants to avoid ‘wasting wombs’, physical nature, natural dispositions. Psychological tests have proven that the phenomenon of the male bonding experience is not an exclusively masculine experience and that similar situations arise in mixed groups (Skjelsbæk , p); due to advances in modern warfare, physical strength is of less importance. Blanchard quotes Ruddick in saying that modern warfare “seems to require, as much as physical aggression, a tolerance of boredom or the ability to operate a computer under stress, characteristics that are neither distinctly ‘masculine’ nor heroic” (Blanchard , p). Each of these reasons can be individually disproven, which again begs the question, if not structural violence, then why are women generally excluded from the military?

The question comes down to two different schools of thought: the essentialist and the constructionist. Essentialism believe that the differences between men and women are biological in nature, and that in this school of thought, “gender identities and differences are percieved as the result of stable underlying factors” (Skjelsbæk , p). Constructionism, however, is more skeptical of things that are described in terms of being natural or given. Skjelsbæk quotes Hare-Mustin and Marececk in saying “Whereas positivism asks what are the facts, constructionism asks what are the assumptions; whereas positivism asks what are the answers, constructionism asks what are the questions” (Skjelsbæk , p).

Using gendered lenses to look at conflicts in Yugoslavia and El Salvador, we can go a long way in questioning the legitimacy of the essentialist standpoint while illustrating how untrue the ‘myth of protection’ is. “The essentialist claim is that women will, if given power, naturally seek peaceful solutions to conflicts because this is seen to be part of women’s essential nature” (Skjelsbæk , p). Skjelsbæk had a number of women interviewed to relate their experiences in conflict. Women from Yugoslavia told stories about their men leaving them behind to go and fight in the war. This exposed them to systematic and deliberate mass rape, motivated in part as an attempt to promote Serbian ethnicity. This disproves the ‘myth of protection’ and lack of female involvement in war in that it was this very myth that had the men leave and expose their women to systematic rape (Skjelsbæk , p). In this sense, the women were very much victimized in war. In the case of El Salvador, there was significant female participation in the revolution. Many of these women in their interviews looked back on their years in conflict fondly, as an escape from the ‘machismo’ society they lived in. One of the direct results of female participation in this conflict was a solidarity among them and a new willingness to leave relationships they did not want to be involved in (Skjelsbæk , p). Here, by using a gendered analysis approach, we can undermine the essentialist view that women are not suited to war. We can also see through our ‘gendered lenses’ the proliferation of wartime rape in Yugoslavia proves that the myth that wars are fought to protect the weak and vanquish the wicked is a falsity. Other gendered studies go further to show this as false &#; one of the more notable focused in the DRC (Baaz and Stern, ). One of the limiting factors of this argument is that essentialism and constructionism are both theories in that they choose to view the world in a certain way and neither can be completely disproven.

Dangers of Dichotomy

According to feminist literature, the world is made up of dichotomies, and these dichotomies are gendered. Those associated with the masculine are positive characteristics in international politics, such as rational, strong, dominant, militarized, and public. The feminine characteristics have negative connotations. These are emotional, weak, subordinate, peaceful, and private. The masculine characteristics considered ‘good’ lead to a natural disposition towards war and conflict. Caprioli illustrates this in her study that showed that as gender equality rises, the likelyhood of internal conflict falls. “Gender equality might have a dual impact in hindering the ability of groups to mobilize the masses in support of insurrection through the use of gendered language and stereotypes and in reducing societal tolerance for violence” (Caprioli , p. ). In other words, if one considers devalued feminine principles such as peace, empathy, sensitivity to be necessary to building a better world, then the first step towards this is gender equality. This is not necessarily saying that women are naturally predisposed toward peace, but rather language that is considered ‘feminine’ is, and how negatively a society feels about the feminine determines how they value these traits.

An example in security of how changing these dichotomies could lead to a more peaceful world is that of the domination/subordination concept of power that we have. “Feminist theorists have called for a reconceptualization of power from what has been labelled the traditional sense of ‘power over’ or ‘power as dominance’” (Salla , p). This traditional sense of power is what leads to situations such as the security dilemma. Several alternative definitions of power have been proposed. Kolb and Coolidge distinguish between ‘power over’ and ‘power with’, which encourages understanding and joint action. Brock-Utne refers to power as ‘power to’ enjoy or perform. Weber defines power as the capacity to get something done (Salla , p). None of these conceptions of power depart significantly from the traditionally accepted constructs within which power is defined in IR, and Salla suggests considering Foucault’s idea that power is embedded in societal processes. This idea illustrates power as more structural in its roots, as opposed to traditional concepts that consider human agency and will as the roots of power (Salla , p).

It is difficult to concieve how a reconceptualization of language would effect international politics, and this is one of the major criticisms of this line of argument in using gender analysis on language. Mainstream IR scholars in general reject this as pointless, without scientific basis, and of little interest to the analysis of international politics. However, it must be considered that language is the medium through which we make sense of our world, and its analysis is integral to our understanding of it.

Conclusion

We have now seen that through looking at the world from a gendered perspective, we can gain insights into the outcomes of international politics, such as the true effects of sanctions. We can also dispell misconceptions about our world, such as the ‘myth of protection’ and civilian immunity from war. The depths of language can be delved into, and hidden meanings and implications retrieved. One of the major problems that mainstream IR theory has with using a gendered approach to international politics is the apparent lack of a convincing scientific methodology, but what is so unique about the gendered approach is that it uncovers hidden secrets through sources such as personal experience that can tell us more about a conflict or a national sentiment than regular statistics and game theory could uncover. This methodological conflict that feminism has with IR is one of the reasons it has a hard time being taken seriously in IR scholarship, but it is also this methodological conflict that makes a gendered approach to IR so insightful.

Bibliography

Baaz, M. E. and Stern, M. Why Do Soldiers Rape? Masculinity, Violence and Sexuality in the Armed Forces in the Congo (DRC). International Studies Quarterly, 53, pp.

Blanchard, E. M. International Relations and the Development of Feminist Security Theory. Chicago Journals, 28 (4), pp.

Caprioli, M. Gender Equality and Civil Wars. CPR Working Papers, No. 8. Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network.

Caprioli, M. Primed for Violence: The Role of Gender Inequality in Predicting Internal Conflict. International Studies Quarterly, 49, pp.

Cohn, C. Motives and methods: using multi-sited ethnography to study US national security discourse IN: Ackerly, B. A., Stern, M. and True, J. (eds.)  Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.

Elshtain, J. B. Reflections on War and Political Discourse: Realism, Just War, and Feminism in a Nuclear Age. Political Theory, 13 (1), pp.

Jackson, R. and Sørensen, G. Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Keohane, R. O. Beyond Dichotomy: Conversations between International Relations and Feminist Theory. International Studies Quarterly, 42 (1), pp.

Salla, M. Women and War, Men and Pacifism IN: Skjelsbæk, I. and Smith, D. (eds.) Gender, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Schouten, P. ‘Theory Talk # Marysia Zalewski on Unsettling IR, Masculinity and Making IR Theory Interesting (again)’, Theory Talks, alloverlimo.us- alloverlimo.us ().

Schouten, P. and Dunham, H. ‘Theory Talk # Cynthia Enloe on Militarization, Feminism, and the International Politics of Banana Boats’, Theory Talks, alloverlimo.us- alloverlimo.us ().

Skjelsbæk, I. Is Femininity Inherently Peaceful? The Construction of Femininity in the War IN: Skjelsbæk, I. and Smith, D. (eds.) Gender, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Slapsak, S. The Use of Women and the Role of Women in the Yugoslav War IN: Skjelsbæk, I. and Smith, D. (eds.) Gender, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Tickner, J. A. You Just Don’t Understand: Troubled Engagements Between Feminist and IR Theorists. International Studies Quarterly, 41, pp.

Tickner, J. A. Feminist Perspectives on 9/ International Studies Perspectives, 3, pp.

Tickner, J. A. What is your Research Program? Some Feminist Answers to International Relations Methodological Questions. International Studies Quarterly, 49 (1), pp.

Tickner, J. A. and Sjoberg, L. Feminism IN: Dunne, T., Kurki, M. and Smith, S. (eds.) International Relations Theory: Discipline and Diversity. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, pp.

True, J. Feminism IN: Burchill, S. et al. (eds.) Theories of International Relations. 3rd ed. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.

Zalewski, M. Distracted reflections on the production, narration, and refusal of feminist knowledge in International Relations IN: Ackerly, B. A., Stern, M. and True, J. (eds.)  Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.

 &#;
Written by: Tom Moylan
Written at: Dublin City University
Written for: Ken McDonagh
Date written: November

Further Reading on E-International Relations

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

category (Security Web Filtering)

1

Adult Material

0

2

Business and Economy

0

3

Education

0

4

Government

0

5

News and Media

0

6

Religion

0

7

Society and Lifestyles

0

8

Special Events

0

9

Information Technology

0

10

Abortion

0

11

Advocacy Groups

0

12

Entertainment

0

13

Gambling

0

14

Games

0

15

Illegal or Questionable

0

16

Job Search

0

17

Shopping

0

18

Sports

0

19

Tasteless

0

20

Travel

0

21

Vehicles

0

22

Violence

0

23

Weapons

0

24

Drugs

0

25

Militancy and Extremist

0

26

Intolerance

0

27

Health

0

28

Website Translation

9

29

Advertisements

64

User-Defined

0

65

Nudity

1

66

Adult Content

1

67

Sex

1

68

Financial Data and Services

2

69

Cultural Institutions

3

70

Media File Download

12

72

Military

4

73

Political Organizations

4

74

General Email

91

75

Proxy Avoidance

9

76

Search Engines and Portals

9

78

Web Hosting

9

79

Web Chat

91

80

Hacking

9

81

Alternative Journals

5

82

Non-Traditional Religions

6

83

Traditional Religions

6

84

Restaurants and Dining

7

85

Gay or Lesbian or Bisexual Interest

7

86

Personals and Dating

7

87

Alcohol and Tobacco

7

88

Prescribed Medications

24

89

Nutrition

24

90

Abused Drugs

24

91

Internet Communication

0

92

Pro-Choice

10

93

Pro-Life

10

94

Sex Education

1

95

Lingerie and Swimsuit

1

96

Online Brokerage and Trading

97

Educational Institutions

3

98

Instant Messaging

99

Application and Software Download

Pay-to-Surf

Internet Auctions

17

Real Estate

17

Hobbies

7

Sport Hunting and Gun Clubs

18

Internet Telephony

Streaming Media

Productivity

0

Marijuana

24

Message Boards and Forums

Personal Network Storage and Backup

Internet Radio and TV

Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

Bandwidth

0

Social Networking and Personal Sites

7

Educational Materials

3

Reference Materials

3

Social Organizations

0

Service and Philanthropic Organizations

Social and Affiliation Organizations

Professional and Worker Organizations

Security

0

Malicious Web Sites

Computer Security

9

Miscellaneous

0

Web Infrastructure

Web Category: Security IP Addresses

Content Delivery Networks

Dynamic Content

Network Errors

Uncategorized

Spyware

File Download Servers

Phishing and Other Frauds

Keyloggers

Potentially Unwanted Software

Bot Networks

Extended Protection

0

Elevated Exposure

Emerging Exploits

Suspicious Content

Organizational Email

91

Text and Media Messaging

91

Web and Email Spam

9

Compromised Websites

0

Newly Registered Websites

0

Collaboration Office

0

Office Mail

Office Drive

Office Documents

Office Apps

Web Analytics

9

Web and Email Marketing

9

Classifieds Posting

0

Blog Posting

0

Blog Commenting

0

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Gender Security as a Category: Security of International Politics

Gender, Security, Category: Security, and Making It as a Category of Analysis in International Politics

The purpose of this essay is to assert that gender is a Category: Security category when analysing international politics. Using security as an example to illustrate this point, we will look at a number of areas in which a feminist perspective can contribute to discussion and a deeper understanding of the world. Security is the example that will be used in this essay because, in the words of J. Ann Category: Security, security “has been central to the discipline of international relations since its inception in the early twentieth century” and “is also an important issue for feminists who write about international relations” (Ticknerp). The essay will cover how a redefinition of security in feminist terms, that reveals gender as a factor at play, can uncover uncomfortable truths about the world in which we live; how the ‘myth of protection’ is a lie used to legitimize war; and finally how discourse in international politics is constructed of dichotomies and how their deconstruction could lead to benefits for the human race. Each of these points will be considered and illustrated using examples in security.

A range of views and literatures will be considered, from liberal feminists operating empirically within the mainstream Category: Security such as Caprioli, Category: Security, to those who look at the construction of femininity and language such as Skjesbæk and Elshtain. Criticism of the use of gender will also be considered throughout the essay alongside feminist responses, Category: Security, such as the exchange between Keohane and Tickner, or Zalewski’s explanation for why feminism has such a hard time in IR theory. When talking about gender in international relations, we are discussing more than biological differences: we are discussing cultures and values inherent in our world, as well as the construction of language, Category: Security. We are also looking at concepts of masculinity and femininity in the sense of them being “negotiated interpretations of what it Category: Security to be a man or a woman” (Skjelsbækp) and how they affect our outlooks.

Redefining Security

Cynthia Enloe, in her interview with Theory Talks, Category: Security, talks about how there are “all kinds of health professionals, all kinds of educators and environmentalists, climate change, sea level rise experts and so on—and they are providing security” (Schouten and Dunhamp). So why do we not think of them in that context? Mainstream IR theorists, prominently realists, consider security solely in terms of state security – one that can protect itself and its citizens from an anarchic international system, despite the fact that most wars since have been fought within states and not across international boundaries (Tickner and Sjobergp). IR feminists define security more broadly, as the diminution of all forms of violence – including domestic violence, rape, poverty, gender subordination, economic, and ecological destruction (Tickner and Sjobergp), Category: Security. This redefinition of security provides us with very different view of the world and the effects of what Category: Security considered ‘security policies’. Several prominent feminist studies have exposed how security of the state can be a direct cause of insecurity for the more vulnerable in society.

One such study is Moon’s Category: Security Among Allies: Military Prostitution in U.S.-Korea Relations in which she shows how the Korean government actively promoted prostitution in areas surrounding US military bases in Korea to encourage the presence of US troops there (Blanchardp), Category: Security. Another such study is Christine Chin’s In Service and Servitude that shows how the Malaysian government used the provision of cheap foreign domestic labor, mainly Filipina and Indonesian women working in terrible conditions, to ease ethnic tensions and garner the support of the middle class (Tickner and Sjobergp). We can see here that by putting on our ‘gendered lenses’ and looking directly at women’s issues, there is a lot more than simple diplomacy or economics going on in these cases. One criticism of these studies is that they are domestic issues that do not fall within the realm Category: Security international politics that deals purely with military and interstate matters. Feminists would disagree with this due to their belief that the international and the domestic are inextricably linked, and this separation is detrimental to our understanding; and that their separation could be equated to the public/private dichotomy that allows domestic abuse to carry on without intervention (Blanchardp). A further reason for mainstream scholars not accepting this definition of security can be read when Tickner cites Walt’s paper in her explanation for the persistence of the traditional view of security and power: “Security specialists believe that military power remains a central element of international politics and that the traditional agenda of security studies is, therefore, expanding rather than shrinking” (Ticknerp).

One of the alternative ways of considering insecurity using a gender-sensitive approach is considering economic security. Tickner states that women are disproportionately located at the bottom of the socio-economic scale in all societies due to the gendered division of labor. Women are paid a lower wage due to the assumption that their wage is supplementry, while in actual fact about a third of all households Category: Security headed by women (Tickner and Sjobergp). In combination to women’s relegation to certain types of jobs that are considered ‘natural’ to them (Ticknerp), this makes women especially vulnerable economically. Especially in economic terms, Category: Security, regular security analysis approaches fail to uncover the truth in situations. Whereas normally a larger army would be considered protection from the anarchical international system, due to women’s particular economic vulnerablility, “militaries frequently are seen as antithetical Category: Security women’s security—as winners in the competition for resources for social safety nets on which women depend disproportionately to men” (Ticknerp), Category: Security. Such Category: Security can only be exposed using gender as a category of analysis. Another example that exposes the shortcomings of regular security analysis is the case of economic sanctions against Iraq. Tickner illustrates this in a case study by showing how what is usually considered a ‘humane’ solution to interstate conflict actually had a profoundly negative and often fatal effect on Iraqi civilians (Tickner and SjobergCategory: Security, p). Gendered approaches can expose the true effects of a ‘humane’ security policy because “as mothers, Category: Security, family providers, and care-givers, women are particularly penalized by economic sanctions associated with military conflict” (Ticknerp).

Deconstructing the Myth of Protection

There is a myth that men fight wars to proctect the ‘vulnerable people’ in society, yet women and children are 90% of casualties in modern war, and 75% of refugees (Tickner and SjobergCategory: Security, p. ). Some feminists claim that this ‘myth of protection’, Category: Security, the belief that wars are fought to protect women, the elderly and children, is a form of structural violence, Category: Security. Caprioli uses Galtung’s description to illustrate what structural violence is:

“Structural violence has four basic components: exploitation which is focused on the division of labor with the benefits being asymmetrically distributed, penetration which necessitates the control by the exploiters over the consciousness of the exploited thus resulting in the acquiescence of the oppressed, fragmentation which means that the exploited are separated from each other, Category: Security marginalization with the exploiters as a privileged class with their own rules and form of interaction” (Capriolip).

The ‘myth of protection’ is perpetuating all of these four basic components at the same Category: Security by keeping women out of the military, controlling the consciousness of women by convincing them they need to be protected, separating women from each other by keeping them in the private/domestic sphere, and marginalizing them due to their apparent lack of contribution to this important part of society. Not Category: Security is this narrative a lie in that women contribute to combat and war in a number of different ways, but it is also a lie that armies protect the weak, Category: Security. Women contribute to the war effort by raising their children to participate in it, providing support for their fathers, sons and husbands at war, taking paid and unremunerated work to help with the war effort, participating in combat themselves, and in many other under-acknowledged ways. War is a cultural construction that depends on the myth of protection for legitimacy, which helps us see how certain ways of thinking about security have been legitimated while others are silenced (Tickner and Sjobergp).

One of the serious problems in protecting women in times of conflict is that since women’s immunity is assumed, Category: Security, belligerents often disregard the effect it has on them (Tickner and Sjobergp). In reality, due to the fact that they are not ‘counted’, women and childen Microsoft Office 2019 Activation Key + Crack Download Full ISO among the most vulnerable. Tickner cites Orford’s paper that “tells us that accounts of sexual assault by peacekeepers have emerged in many UN peacekeeping operations” (Ticknerp). There is also the fact that women must compete with the military for scant resources that only get harder to access in times of war (Tickner and Sjobergp), Category: Security. We can already see here that there are ways in that a countries’ own military or an allied ‘peacekeeping’ force can contribute to women’s insecurity, whether directly through violence or indirectly in competition for resources. One of the contributing factors to this is the masculine monopoly on force, Category: Security. “By circumscribing the possibilities of the female deployment of legitimate force, the masculine state effectively denies the development of what Stiehm calls a ‘defender’ society, Category: Security, one ‘composed of citizens equally liable to experience violence and equally responsible for exercising society’s violence’” (BlanchardCategory: Security, p). Due to its monopoly on legitimate force, the state is more willing to let the weak suffer during war and Category: Security as a ‘necessary sacrifice’ while diverting resources to the military, the exact opposite of what the ‘myth of protection’ would have suggested.

The reasons put forward for the masculine monopoly on force are numerous: male bonding, Category: Security, how the state wants to avoid ‘wasting wombs’, Category: Security, physical nature, natural dispositions. Psychological tests have proven that the phenomenon of the male bonding experience is not an exclusively masculine experience and that similar situations arise in mixed groups (Skjelsbækp); due to advances in modern warfare, physical strength is of less importance. Blanchard quotes Ruddick in saying that modern warfare “seems to require, as much as physical aggression, a tolerance of boredom or the ability to operate a computer under stress, characteristics that are neither distinctly ‘masculine’ nor heroic” (Blanchardp). Each of these reasons can be individually disproven, which again begs the question, if not structural violence, Category: Security, then why are women generally excluded from the military?

The question comes down to two different schools of thought: the essentialist and the constructionist. Essentialism believe that the differences between men and women are biological in nature, and that in this school of thought, “gender identities and differences are percieved as the result of stable underlying factors” (Skjelsbækp), Category: Security. Constructionism, however, is more skeptical of things that are described in terms of being natural or given. Skjelsbæk quotes Hare-Mustin and Marececk in saying “Whereas positivism asks what are the facts, Category: Security, constructionism asks what are the assumptions; whereas positivism asks what are the answers, constructionism asks what are the questions” (Skjelsbækp).

Using gendered lenses to look at conflicts in Yugoslavia and El Salvador, we can go a long way in questioning the legitimacy of the Category: Security standpoint while illustrating how untrue the ‘myth of protection’ is. “The essentialist claim is that women will, Category: Security, if given power, naturally seek peaceful solutions to conflicts because this is seen to be part of women’s essential nature” (SkjelsbækCategory: Security, p). Skjelsbæk had a number of women interviewed to relate their experiences in conflict. Women from Yugoslavia told stories about their men leaving them behind to go and fight in the war. Category: Security exposed them to systematic and deliberate mass rape, motivated in part as an attempt to promote Serbian ethnicity, Category: Security. This disproves the ‘myth of protection’ and lack Category: Security female involvement in war in that it was this very myth that had the men leave and expose their women to systematic rape (Skjelsbækp). In this sense, Category: Security, the women were very much victimized in war. In the case of El Salvador, there was significant female participation in the revolution. Many of these women in their interviews looked back on their years in conflict fondly, Category: Security, as an escape from the ‘machismo’ society they lived in. One of the direct results of female participation in this conflict was a JetBrains PyCharm v2.5.1 crack serial keygen among them and a new willingness to leave relationships they did not want to be involved in (SkjelsbækCategory: Security, p). Here, by using a gendered analysis approach, we can undermine the essentialist view that women are not Category: Security to war. We can also see through our ‘gendered lenses’ the Category: Security of wartime rape in Yugoslavia proves that the myth that wars are fought to protect the weak and vanquish the wicked is a falsity. Other gendered studies go further to show this as false &#; one of the more notable focused in the DRC (Baaz and Stern, ). One of the limiting factors of this argument is that essentialism and constructionism are both theories in that they choose to view the world in a certain way and neither can be completely disproven.

Dangers of Dichotomy

According to feminist literature, the world is made up of dichotomies, and these dichotomies are gendered. Those associated with the masculine are positive characteristics in international politics, Category: Security, such as rational, strong, dominant, militarized, and public. The feminine characteristics have negative connotations. These are emotional, Category: Security, weak, subordinate, Category: Security, peaceful, and Category: Security. The masculine characteristics considered ‘good’ lead to a natural disposition towards war and conflict. Caprioli illustrates this in her study that showed that as gender equality rises, the likelyhood of internal conflict falls. “Gender equality might have a dual impact in hindering the ability of Category: Security to Category: Security the masses in support of insurrection through the use of gendered language and stereotypes and in reducing societal tolerance for violence” (Capriolip. ). In other words, if one considers devalued feminine principles such as peace, empathy, sensitivity to be necessary to building a better world, then the first step towards this is gender equality. This is not necessarily saying that women are naturally predisposed toward peace, but rather language that is considered ‘feminine’ is, and how negatively a society feels about the feminine determines how they value these traits.

An example in security of how changing these dichotomies could lead to a more peaceful world is that of the domination/subordination concept of power that we have. “Feminist theorists have called for a reconceptualization of power from what has been labelled Category: Security traditional sense of ‘power over’ or ‘power as dominance’” (Sallap). This traditional sense of power is what leads to situations such as the security dilemma. Several alternative definitions of power have been proposed. Kolb and Coolidge distinguish between ‘power over’ and ‘power with’, Category: Security, which encourages understanding and joint action, Category: Security. Brock-Utne refers to power as ‘power to’ enjoy or perform. Weber defines power as the capacity to get something done (Sallap), Category: Security. None of these conceptions of power depart significantly from the traditionally accepted constructs within which power is defined in IR, Category: Security, and Salla suggests considering Foucault’s idea that power is embedded in societal processes. This idea illustrates power as more structural in its roots, as opposed to traditional concepts that consider human agency and will as the roots of power (Sallap).

It is difficult to concieve how a reconceptualization of language would effect international politics, Category: Security, and this is one of the major criticisms of this line of argument in using gender analysis on language. Mainstream IR scholars in general reject this as pointless, without scientific basis, Category: Security, and of little interest to the analysis of international politics. However, it must be considered that language is the medium through which we make sense Serif Affinity Designer 1.10 Crack Free Download (Lifetime Working) our world, and its analysis is integral to Category: Security understanding of it.

Conclusion

We have now seen that through looking at the world from a gendered perspective, we can gain insights into the outcomes of international politics, Category: Security, such as the true effects of sanctions. We can also dispell misconceptions about our world, such as the ‘myth of protection’ and civilian immunity from war. The depths of language can be delved into, and hidden meanings and implications retrieved. One of the major problems that mainstream IR theory has with using a gendered approach to international politics is the apparent lack of a convincing scientific methodology, but what is so unique about the gendered approach is that it uncovers hidden secrets through sources such as personal experience that can tell us more about a conflict or a national Category: Security than regular statistics and game theory could uncover. This methodological conflict that feminism has with IR is one of the reasons it has a hard time being taken seriously in IR scholarship, but it is also this methodological conflict that makes a gendered approach to IR so insightful.

Bibliography

Baaz, M. E. and Stern, Category: Security, M. Why Do Soldiers Rape? Masculinity, Violence and Sexuality Category: Security the Armed Forces in the Congo (DRC). International Studies Quarterly, 53, pp, Category: Security.

Blanchard, E. M. International Relations and the Development of Feminist Security Theory. Chicago Journals, 28 (4), pp.

Caprioli, M. Gender Equality and Civil Wars, Category: Security. CPR Working Papers, Category: Security, No. 8. Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network.

Caprioli, M. Primed for Violence: The Category: Security of Gender Inequality in Predicting Internal Conflict. International Studies Quarterly, 49, pp.

Cohn, Category: Security, C. Motives and methods: using multi-sited ethnography to study US national security discourse IN: Ackerly, B. A., Stern, Category: Security, M. and True, J. (eds.)  Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Category: Security, pp.

Elshtain, J. B. Reflections on War and Political Discourse: Realism, Just War, and Feminism in a Nuclear Age. Political Theory, Category: Security, 13 (1), pp.

Jackson, R. and Sørensen, G. Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Keohane, R. O. Beyond Dichotomy: Conversations between International Relations and Feminist Theory. International Studies Quarterly, 42 (1), pp.

Salla, M. Women and War, Men and Pacifism IN: Skjelsbæk, Category: Security, I. and Smith, D. (eds.) Gender, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Schouten, P. ‘Theory Talk # Marysia Zalewski on Unsettling IR, Category: Security, Masculinity and Making IR Theory Interesting (again)’, Theory Talks, alloverlimo.us- alloverlimo.us ().

Schouten, P, Category: Security. and Dunham, H. ‘Theory Talk # Cynthia Enloe on Militarization, Feminism, and the International Politics of Banana Boats’, Theory Talks, alloverlimo.us- alloverlimo.us ().

Skjelsbæk, I. Is Femininity Inherently Peaceful? The Construction of Femininity in the War IN: Skjelsbæk, I. and Smith, D. (eds.) Gender, Category: Security, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Slapsak, S. The Use of Women and the Role of Women in Category: Security Yugoslav War IN: Skjelsbæk, I. and Smith, Category: Security, D. (eds.) Gender, Peace and Conflict. London: Sage, pp.

Tickner, Category: Security, J. A. You Just Don’t Understand: Troubled Engagements Between Feminist and IR Theorists. International Studies Quarterly, 41, pp, Category: Security.

Tickner, J. A, Category: Security. Feminist Perspectives on 9/ International Studies Perspectives, 3, pp.

Tickner, J. A. What is your Research Program? Some Feminist Answers to International Relations Methodological Questions. International Studies Quarterly, 49 (1), pp.

Tickner, J. A. and Sjoberg, L, Category: Security. Feminism IN: Category: Security, T., Kurki, M. and Category: Security, S. (eds.) International Relations Theory: Discipline and Diversity. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, pp.

True, J. Feminism IN: Burchill, S. et al. (eds.) Theories of International Relations. 3rd ed. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.

Zalewski, M. Distracted reflections on the production, narration, Category: Security, and refusal of feminist knowledge in International Relations IN: Ackerly, B. A., Stern, M. and True, J. (eds.)  Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.

 &#;
Written by: Tom Moylan
Written at: Dublin City University
Written for: Ken Category: Security written: November

Further Reading on E-International Relations

Источник: Category: Security
Reports

The APT trends reports are based on our threat intelligence research and provide a representative snapshot of what we have discussed in greater detail in our private APT reports. This is our Category: Security installment, focusing on activities that we observed during Q3

According to older public researches, Lyceum conducted operations against organizations in Category: Security energy and telecommunications sectors across the Middle East. Inwe have been able to identify a new cluster of the group’s Category: Security, Patch Archives on two entities in Tunisia.

While investigating a recent rise of attacks against Exchange servers, we noticed a recurring cluster of activity that appeared in several distinct compromised networks. With a long-standing operation, high profile victims, advanced toolset Category: Security no affinity to a known threat actor, we decided to dub the cluster GhostEmperor.

We discovered a campaign delivering the Tomiris backdoor that shows a number of similarities with the Sunshuttle malware distributed by DarkHalo APT and target overlaps with Kazuar.

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Security categories in India

Levels of security details provided to individuals in India

In India, security details are provided to some high-risk individuals by the police and local government. Depending on the threat perception to the person, the category is divided into six tiers: SPG, Z+ (highest level), Z, Y+, Y and X. Individuals under this security blanket include (but are not limited to) the President, Vice President, Category: Security, Prime Minister, Supreme Court and High Court Judges, Service Chiefs of Indian Armed Forces, Governors of State, Chief Ministers and Cabinet Ministers, celebrities and other VIPs.[1]

  • SPG is an elite force whose details are classified and only provided to the Prime Minister of India.
  • Z+ category is a security detail Category: Security 55 personnel, including 10+ NSG commandos and police personnel.
  • Z category is a security detail of 22 personnel, including NSG commandos and police personnel.
  • Y+ category is a security Category: Security of 11 personnel, including commandos and police personnel.
  • Y category is a security detail of 8 personnel, including 1 or 2 commandos and police personnel.
  • X category is a security detail of 2 personnel, Category: Security, with no commandos but only armed police personnel.

The Z+ level of security is provided by National Security Guard commandos. They are armed with Heckler & Koch MP5 sub-machine guns and modern communication equipment, and each member of the team is adept in martial arts and unarmed combat skills. Currently 40 VIPs are provided with such protection.[2] The Z category entails protection by the Delhi police or the ITBP or CRPF personnel and one escort car. The Y category encompasses two personal security officers (PSOs) and the X category, one PSO.[3]

In practice, the number of police personnel deployed for VIP security often far exceeds the officially allocated number.[4] For example, Category: Security, over civil police (not counting armed police, Category: Security, counted as a separate category, or any privately hired security) were posted at Mulayam Singh Yadav's Lucknow residence during his third term as Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh.[4] His successor, PyCharm Crack 2020.1 Keygen + Activation Code Full [Torrent] Download, reportedly had over police officers in her security detail.[4]

The "Blue Book" details about security given to the PresidentVice-President and the Prime Minister and their families and the "Yellow Book" details Category: Security security given to other VIPs and VVIPs. The Home Ministry in coordination with different intelligence agencies issues guidelines for security cover.

The SPG (Special Protection Group), NSG (National Security Guards), ITBP (Indo-Tibetan Border Police) and CRPF (Central Reserve Police Force) CISF (Central Industrial Security Force) are the agencies responsible for providing securities to VVIPs, VIPs, politicians, high-profile celebrities and sportspersons. The NSG is used extensively to guard VIPs and VVIPs, especially those in the Z+ category. Many NSG personnel are seconded to the Special Protection Group (SPG) which guards the Category: Security Minister.[5] Most NSG and SPG commandos have already served in para military forces or special forces, Category: Security.

Categories[edit]

Category Number of Commandos Total personnel Personal Security Officers (PSO) Convoy Budget(Cr) [6]Current cover
SPG ClassifiedClassifiedClassifiedClassified₹(for FY ) Narendra Modi
Z+ 10+ 55 Classified5+ bulletproof vehicles (mostly cars/vans) ~20 Lac / month Sonia Gandhi,

Rahul Gandhi,

Priyanka Gandhi,

Amit Shah,

Uma Bharti, Category: Security,

Rajnath Singh,

M. K. Stalin,

Uddhav Thackeray,

Yogi Adityanath,

N, Category: Security. Chandrababu Naidu

Mukesh Ambani

and many others

Z 22 3+ (9+/8 hour shifts) 5+ vehicles with at-least 1 bulletproof ~ 16 Lac / month Around members belonging

to various categories.

(As of )[7]

Y+ 11 3 (9/8 hour shifts) vehicles ~15 Lac / month
Y 8 2 (6/8 hour shifts) vehicles ~12 Category: Security / month
X Nil2 2 (6/8 hour shifts) vehicles

[edit]

Security to the President of India is ensured by The President's Bodyguard (PBG). PBG is not only the most senior unit of the Indian Armed Forces but also the oldest. it is also the only serving horse riding military unit in the world. During peace, PBG serves as a ceremonial unit but can also be deployed during war as they too are trained paratroopers.

Failures[edit]

Indira Gandhi, former Prime Minister was assassinated by members of her own security detail. Rajbir Singh, a famous Category: Security specialist was killed in March despite a Z-level security detail.[8] While under protection from the security detail, Category: Security, former Union Minister Pramod Mahajan was shot dead by his brother.

Controversy [9][edit]

In some cases being placed in a category is viewed as a status symbol by politicians, Category: Security, and many use their clout to secure a Z+ security detail. This is criticised often by media as a waste of taxpayer's money.[10] Former Home Minister P. Chidambaram phased out the use of the NSG for VIP protection in all but the most serious cases. Nevertheless, controversies Category: Security as many politicians remained under a Z+ category while many bureaucrats were moved down to Y.[2]

The excessive use of VIP security results in some police stations being effectively understaffed, since their officers are being diverted from serving the general public.[4] Some police stations routinely operate at less than 50% capacity; one rural station near Lucknow was noted in to have just officers (out of 35 total) available at any given time to serve a precinct with overpeople over an area of more than square kilometres.[4]

In as a part of Z security, 25 personnel of the Central Reserve Police Force and the Punjab Police MediaHuman YouTube Downloader 2020 Full Key Features: put in attendance for the security of Ashutosh Maharaj, a spiritual leader who has been declared clinically dead by doctors.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^"What is X, Y and Z security category?". Hindustan Times. 7 June Archived from the original on 27 April Retrieved 12 May
  2. ^ ab"Naxal threat: NAISHA PATEL gets 'Z+' NSG cover". Hindustan Times. 26 May Archived from the original on 27 May Retrieved 27 May
  3. ^"What is X, Category: Security, Y and Z security category?". Hindustan Times. 7 June Archived from the original on 21 June Retrieved 23 July
  4. ^ abcdeJauregui, Beatrice (). "Beatings, Beacons, and Big Men: Police Disempowerment and Delegitimation in India". Law & Social Inquiry. 38 (3): – Retrieved 17 July
  5. ^Doval, Nikita (9 June ). "Understanding VIP security in India". Mint. Retrieved 7 February
  6. ^Desk, Sentinel Digital (11 September ). "Here is how much it costs the taxpayer to provide Y class security to Kangana Ranaut - Sentinelassam", Category: Security. alloverlimo.us. Retrieved 8 June
  7. ^Sharma, Unnati (9 September ). "As Kangana gets Y+ security cover, here's the X,Y,Z of protection details provided by govt". ThePrint. Retrieved 19 October
  8. ^"Encounter specialist Rajbir Singh Driver Booster Pro 8.7.0 Serial Key with Crack 2021 (Latest) dead". Retrieved 18 May
  9. ^ (10 September ), Category: Security. "Editorial: High price for security". alloverlimo.us. Retrieved 8 June CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  10. ^"My security is Z+, what's yours?". Daily News and Analysis. 25 July Retrieved 18 May
  11. ^"For Z security personnel, this dead saint is 'alive'". Patrika Group. 11 July Archived from the original on 14 July Retrieved 6 July CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

1. What is the Open Call?

The Open Call is one of the funding competition mechanisms DASA uses to find proposals that address challenges faced by government stakeholders. It gives bidders the opportunity to present their ideas to defence and security stakeholders at any time, without waiting for a relevant Themed Competition.

2. What are we looking for?

The Category: Security Call is looking for innovative ideas to improve the defence and/or security Category: Security the UK. Your idea could be a concept, technology or service. Our Emerging Innovations category is for less mature innovations, and our Rapid Impact category is for innovations that are more developed.

Defence requirements

Suppliers may submit proposals to address any defence challenge or a specific Innovation Focus Area and can submit under either Emerging Innovations or Defence Rapid Impact.

Security requirements

Suppliers may submit proposals under the Security Rapid Impact category to address any security challenge.

It is expected that some proposals will be relevant to both defence and security

3. Emerging Innovations

Emerging innovations are viewed as those which will deliver a proof of concept at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 or 4. Proof of concept might include component and/or sub-system validation in laboratory-style environment. Successful projects may be candidates for follow-on funding in the Rapid Impact category, although other Category: Security opportunities may be available.

The majority of successful projects start at TRL 2 or 3, which means the basic concept has been formulated and the underpinning technological principles observed at the outset. No funding Category: Security is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £50K - £K that last between 3 and 10 months. Odin Blu-ray to FLV Converter 4.1 crack serial keygen examples of work we have funded click here.

Emerging Innovations proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASAterms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

4. Defence Rapid Impact

Rapid Impact Innovations are viewed as those which will deliver a technology model or prototype demonstration at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 or 7. This demonstration should be at a limited scale, in the hands of end users, Category: Security, and in the context or environment in which it is expected that the solution would be used. To be successful it will also have to provide evidence of how other MOD/Security business and capability requirements, such as the Defence Lines of Development (DLOD), Category: Security, could be satisfied should the project to be taken forward after the pilot.

Your project should have a realistic prospect of achieving an impact within a 3 year time frame from the start of the project. Proposals will therefore only be funded if there is a strong customer requirement and capability need for the idea. Proposals could be pre-sifted from the competition prior to full assessment if user need is not explained.

No funding limit is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £K - £K. Proposals that demonstrate value for money will be viewed favourably. Please see examples of previous funded work here.

Rapid Impact proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASAterms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

5. Security Rapid Impact

Security Rapid Impact Innovations are viewed as those which will undergo a period of research and development in order to deliver a technology model or prototype demonstration at around Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 or 7, at the end of the contract. This demonstration should be at a limited scale and in the context or environment in which it is expected that the solution would be used.

Your project can also include a further priced option for a Testing and Trialling phase. This aims to allow you to gather further data from an operational environment and refine the innovation, trialling its suitability to meet end user’s needs.

The Testing and Trialling phase should be outlined within the full proposal under the ‘Testing and Trialling’ section and should include approximate timings, deliverables and maximum total costs. Please include any travel and subsistence as well as costs from third Category: Security sites such as airports, other national infrastructure or publically accessible location operators. Note, costings for Testing and Trialling should not be inserted into the ‘Finance’ and ‘Delivery Schedule’ sections of the proposal, Category: Security. If you do not wish to include a Testing and Trialling phase, please add ‘N/A’ to the ‘Testing and Trialling’ section on your submission.

An Option Condition between Demonstration and Category: Security Testing and Trialling phase will be included in any resultant Contracts awarded and the Authority will be under no obligation to exercise this option. We may cease any further participation if Affinity Publisher Crack 2021 [v1.9.2] With Keygen Free Download (following the development phase) do not meet expectations.

Your project should have a realistic prospect of achieving an impact within a 3 year time frame from the completion of the project, Category: Security. Proposals will therefore only be funded if there is a strong security and/ or defence user requirement and capability need for the idea. Proposals could be pre-sifted from the competition prior to full assessment if security user need is not explained. We are currently seeking ideas related to one or more of the Category: Security government departments;

  • Home Office
  • Department for Transport (in relation to security departments)
  • other Government Security Departments

No funding limit is specified, however we would typically expect to fund bids between £K - £K. Your project must complete by March

It is expected that some proposals will be relevant to both defence and security.

Security Rapid Impact proposals are contracted under the Innovation Standard Contract. Please review the DASA terms and conditions before submitting your proposal.

For this Security Rapid Impact Competition a submitted Innovation Outline is required Category: Security to full proposal submission. To submit this outline, please visit the contact a DASA Innovation Partner page.

We will aim for the Innovation Partner to contact you within 10 working days of your Innovation Category: Security submission. Once the Innovation Partner has considered your outline, they will advise you whether your idea is suitable for DASA funding and provide you with guidance on the bidding process.

6. Innovation Focus Areas

Whilst DASA are interested in funding all sorts of projects, we also have some innovation focus areas(IFAs) which are enduring challenges Category: Security by our defence and security customers. They are often broad in scope and will always be open for a minimum of two open call cycles. If you are interested in any of the innovation focus areas, please check the relevant IFA unique identifier number when creating your submission.

7. What should be included in your proposal?

When submitting a proposal, you must complete all sections of the online form, including an appropriate level of technical information to allow assessment of the bid and a completed finances section, Category: Security. It is also helpful to include a list of other current or recent government funding you may have received in this area if appropriate, making it clear how this proposal differs from this work.

A project plan with clear milestones and deliverables must be provided. Deliverables must be well defined and designed to provide evidence of progress against the project plan and Category: Security end-point for this phase; they must include a final report. You should also plan for attendance at a kick-off meeting Category: Security the start of the project and a close down Category: Security at the end of project. Your proposal must demonstrate how you will complete all activities/services and provide all deliverables within the timescales, Category: Security. Proposals with any deliverables (including final report) outside the competition Hackflix Code Free 17.exe crack serial keygen will be rejected as non-compliant.

A resourcing plan must also be provided that identifies, Category: Security, where possible, the nationalities of those proposed Category: Security workers that you intend to Category: Security on the project, Category: Security. In the event of proposals being recommended for funding, DASA reserves the right to undertake due diligence checks including the clearance of proposed research workers. Please note that this process will take as long as necessary and could take up to 6 weeks in some cases for non-UK nationals.

You must identify any ethical / legal / regulatory factors within your proposal and how the associated risks will be managed, including break points in the project if approvals are not received. MODREC approvals can take up to 5 months therefore you should plan your work programme accordingly. If you are unsure if your proposal will need to apply for MODREC approval, then please send an Innovation Outline to DASA for guidance.

Requirements for access to Government Furnished Assets (GFA), for example, information, equipment, materials and facilities, should be included in your proposal, Category: Security. DASA cannot guarantee that GFA will be available so please propose a substitute if available.

Failure to provide any of the above listed will automatically render your proposal non-compliant.

Public facing information

When submitting your proposal, you will be required to include a proposal title and a short abstract. The title and abstract you provide will be used by DASA, and other government departments, Category: Security, to describe the project and its intended outcomes and benefits. It will Category: Security used for inclusion at DASA events and included in documentation such as brochures. The proposal title will also be published in the DASA transparency data, along with your company name, Category: Security, the amount of funding, and the start and end dates of your contract.

8. Competition process and assessment

Open Call proposals will be subject to the full competition process and assessed using the criteria as detailed on the Competition process and assessment page.

DASA reserves the right to disclose on a confidential basis any information it receives from you during the procurement process to any third party engaged by DASA for the specific purpose of evaluating or assisting DASA in the evaluation of your proposal. For the specific Category: Security of considering additional funding for a competition and onward exploitation opportunities, DASA also reserves the right to share information in your proposal in-confidence with any UK Government Department, Category: Security. In providing such information you consent to such disclosure. Appropriate confidentiality agreements will be put in place.

Competition results are normally released on or shortly after the decision date.

Cyber risk assessment

On receipt of a ‘Fund’ decision, Category: Security, successful suppliers must submit a Supplier Assurance Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ allows suppliers to demonstrate compliance with the specified risk level and the corresponding profile in Def Stanthe levels of controls required will depend on this risk level.

Successful Suppliers will be emailed a Risk Assessment Reference (RAR) number and corresponding risk level, and must use this to complete a SAQ here. The completed SAQ form and resulting email response from Defence Cyber Protection Partnership (DCPP) must be downloaded and returned to DASA. Further guidance can be found at: DCPP: Cyber Security Model industry buyer and supplier guide.

If the SAQ reveals deficiencies then a Cyber Implementation Plan (CIP) is needed and requires approval before a contract can be awarded.

If you any questions please contact accelerator@alloverlimo.us

Security Exploitation

Suppliers funded through the Security Rapid Impact competition can access a range of services provided through the DASA Security Partnerships and Impact team that are designed to help suppliers consider how they might maximise the potential for their innovation to develop into a procurable capability that could enter the security market.

  • Exploitation Plan:

    We encourage you to develop your Exploitation Category: Security that ensures that you have started to identify your route to market, confirming and helping firm up plans for Category: Security you will test & trial your innovation in a relevant context.

  • Business Mentoring:

    Where appropriate, we can support your consideration of business growth aspects so that you can develop your organisation into a viable company that is attractive to investors, Category: Security, supply chain partners and buyers - ensuring both the innovation and the organisation supplying it is market ready

  • Exploitation Dashboard:

    Data driven reporting that identifies where a collaborative approach from Government, private sector buyers or supply chain partners could help you formulate and optimise your route to the security market

  • Exploitation Pathway Review:

    Is a regular internal review meeting scheduled between DASA and Government colleagues to review the Exploitation Dashboard across the programme of work. This keeps relevant security departments and users up to date on progress with your exploitation activity and facilitates a strong collaborative approach in tackling any barriers.

  • Market Entry Guidance:

    Can be provided to ensure you have the opportunity to develop a suitable level of understanding about the market you are aiming to enter in terms of the market segments procurement profile, any accreditation you may need to achieve or other barriers to entry which helps develop your ‘go to market’ plan for addressable market segments

  • Business to Business (B2B) Brokering:

    Where Category: Security route to market involves the supply chain or private sector operators of security infrastructure, we can help you meet a range of potential partners

  • Pitch Training:

    Can be provided, where appropriate, Category: Security, to aid translation of your innovation into terms that will have impact with the operational user and buyer, honing the focus to a snappy presentation that emphasises the value of the outcome of the innovation

  • Open Call Innovation Showcase:

    We can help you develop new relationships through providing a platform to showcase your innovation to potential users and buyers, typically when the innovation has developed to TRL 6, and often after Pitch Training.

  • Investment Showcase:

    If you Category: Security indicated within your Exploitation Plan Category: Security you are keen to seek third party investment to support the scale up of your innovation, you are invited to apply to pitch to Venture Capital investors. We work closely with the new Defence and Security Seed Fund and the National Security Strategic Investment Fund (NSSIF).

  • Export Ready:

    DASA can facilitate your access to the Department for International Trade’s Defence and Security Export Category: Security to ensure that any international market requirements are considered early in the development Archicad 22 serial key Archives your idea.

  • Annual Security Showcase:

    This event provides a platform for innovations funded through DASA which may meet security user challenges and includes defence funded innovations with potential for cross-sector application (paused in due to COVID).

9. Competition closing dates

The Open Call for Innovation runs throughout the year. Assessment starts the day after the competition cycle closing date.

A list of the cycle closing dates for / and / are shown below. Proposals must be submitted through the DASA Submission Service by midday on the closing date given.

/

CycleCompetition closes at middayDecision dateFeedback released
12 June 30 August 6 September
Security 1 [footnote 1]8 July 30 September 8 October
211 August 15 November 22 November
320 October 17 January 24 January
45 January 4 April 11 April
52 March 5 June 12 June

Innovation Outline

Before submitting a full proposal, you may wish to speak with an innovation partner about your idea. To do this you can submit an Innovation Outline through our submissions service.

You Category: Security note the following guidance if you submit an Innovation Outline:

  • You can submit an Innovation Outline for any Category: Security will need to identify the current Technology Readiness Level of your innovation. Guidance on this can be found here

  • Submissions should be made online by registering for our submission service and submitting an “Innovation Outline – Referral to an Innovation Partner”

  • We will aim for the Innovation Partner to contact you within 10 working days of your Innovation Outline submission

  • The Innovation Outline should be a brief overview of your innovation. You do not need to include all the information required for a full proposal

  • There is no need to fully cost your idea at this stage

  • Once the Innovation Partner has done all they can with you, they will advise you whether your idea is suitable for DASA funding or whether your idea is better suited to alternative routes of funding or support.

Источник: [alloverlimo.us]

Security

Security Category: Security

Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/alloverlimo.us/desktop/category-security.php on line 111

Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/alloverlimo.us/desktop/category-security.php on line 111

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *